Artificial Respiration: will Russia End Tuberculosis by 2030

In 2016, 1.3 million people worldwide died of tuberculosis. Over the same year, 10.4 million people fell ill with tuberculosis

Author: Anastasia Petrova, Russia

March 24 is World Tuberculosis Day. Tuberculosis (TB) is the ninth leading cause of death worldwide. Russia is one of the top three countries with the highest burden of drug-resistant TB. At the first World Health Organisation Global Ministerial Conference on Ending TB held at the end of the last year in Moscow, the Russian Minister of Health Veronika Skvortsova proclaimed that Russia, supporting the global community goal, aims to end TB by 2030. Experts comment on how feasible this goal is.

Treatment is not cost efficient

Tuberculosis is called a biosocial disease as people from the most socially disadvantaged populations face the highest risk of being infected. People from low- and middle-income countries – India, Indonesia, China, Nigeria, Pakistan, Philippines and South Africa – are affected the most. Such countries cannot procure the required drugs at high prices and, as the treatment access experts point out, it is not cost effective for the pharmaceutical companies to invest in the production of drugs, which will not bring them enough income. It complicates the development and launch of new drugs, while the lack of innovative drugs leads to the development of drug-resistant forms of tuberculosis, aggravating the situation.

In 2016, 1.3 million people worldwide died of tuberculosis. Over the same year, 10.4 million people fell ill with tuberculosis.

Sustainable threat

TB morbidity rate in Russia is 58.44 cases per 100,000 people. On one hand, there has been a steady declining trend in TB mortality in the country since 2005 (except for the vulnerable populations). According to the WHO, in 2016 the mortality rate was 8.2 cases per 100,000 people a year (as compared to 16 cases in 2011). On the other hand, WHO experts observe two crucial problems in the Russian Federation: growth in TB morbidity among people living with HIV and widespread of the drug-resistant forms of TB – extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB), multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB), and rifampicin-resistant tuberculosis (RR-TB).

According to the WHO, Russia is one of the top three countries with the highest burden of extensively and totally drug-resistant tuberculosis, with higher rates in India and China only. In 2016, the share of XDR-TB in the new TB cases in Russia was 27%, and in recurrent TB cases – 65%. It means that now there is no effective treatment for many people. Only 31% of people recover from XDR-TB. The cause of drug-resistant TB is first of all associated with treatment interruptions. The main reason of patients “dropping out” is the lack of social support.

“Patients should not only be treated but should also be provided with comprehensive social support. The treatment is long and hard, it takes over a year. It leads to many people losing their jobs. If people have no means of subsistence, they have to stop their treatment and go to work. The situation is even more complicated for people who have small children,” says Svetlana Prosvirina, member of TBpeople, the Eastern European and Central Asian network of people with experience of TB. “Such drop-outs are extremely dangerous as the bacteria which survive after the treatment interruption adjusts to the medications, which contributes to TB evolution to MDR-TB and XDR-TB.”

Coverage of people living with HIV with treatment is low

Experts agree that to curb the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030, the government should make efforts to fight drug-resistant forms of TB and create conditions for the patients not to interrupt treatment

Tuberculosis is the main AIDS-defining disease and the leading cause of death among people living with human immunodeficiency virus. The risk of co-infection is related to the low immune function of people living with HIV, who need to receive antiretroviral therapy (ART) constantly to stabilize their immune responses. However, in Russia treatment coverage of people living with HIV remains extremely low. According to the Federal AIDS Research Centre of the Rospotrebnadzor Central Research Institute of Epidemiology, in 2017 the coverage rate was only 35.5%.

People who use drugs are also in a difficult situation. TB activists point out that TB treatment clinics often do not have a drug counsellor and sometimes do not even have a license to provide help to people who suffer from the abstinence syndrome (group of symptoms with varying combinations and severity, which develop when a person terminates using psychoactive substances or reduces the dose taken after their recurrent use, usually during a long-term and/or in high doses – editor’s note). Those symptoms make the patients refuse from further treatment, which not only leads to drug resistance but also creates pre-conditions for further transmission of the disease.

Ending TB by 2030

Experts agree that to curb the epidemic of tuberculosis by 2030, the government should make efforts to fight drug-resistant forms of TB and create conditions for the patients not to interrupt treatment.

“Comprehensive support of vulnerable populations, including the patients, is required to prevent the spread of tubercle bacillus,” says Kseniya Shenina, activist, member of the TBpeople Coordination Council.

Based on the conclusions of the Russian Public Mechanism for Monitoring of Drug Policy Reform, an important pre-condition to overcome the problem is the revision of the Russian drug policy in compliance with the “Support Don’t Punish” approach. Experts believe that the country urgently needs to approve recommendations of the numerous UN bodies on drugs and HIV, including recommendations of the Committee on Economic and Social Rights. Only compliance with these conditions will make the goal of ending tuberculosis by 2030 more feasible.

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