AFEW Kazakhstan Helps People Getting out of the Shadows

29,568 HIV cases were registered in Kazakhstan as of February 2017. According to the official data, in 2016 there were14,345 tuberculosis patients registered in the country. Usually, these people hide themselves, and are often afraid even to tell their relatives about their diagnosis. But there are also those who openly talk about their status, and who show that it is possible to get out of the shadow.

At the end of March, the photo exhibition ‘Life in the Shadow’ dedicated to the World Tuberculosis Day took place in Almaty. AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan organized this event. The exhibition featured photos of people affected by HIV and tuberculosis. Today we will tell the stories of some of them.

LEARN TO LOVE YOURSELF

After the death of her mother in 2008, Venera started to lose weight. The woman thought it was because of the grief she was experiencing, but still went to the hospital for the X-rays and medical tests. There it was discovered that Venera had an open form of tuberculosis.

Venera realized that it does not matter what your position in the society is, the tuberculosis makes everyone equal

“By that time, I was very weak and all the time felt sick in my stomach. I weighed 48 kilograms,” says Venera. “During three months I was out there with an open form of tuberculosis until they accepted me in the hospital. All I wanted at that time was to lie down and die! I was in darkness, alone, rejected by everyone. I did not believe that I would get out of that hospital alive. All the time I was sick because of the pills. My son and my sister, who, after my mother’s death, was taken to an orphanage, as I did not have time to register custody, were the only people who kept me alive. They called me, told me they needed me, asked not to die. It was the strongest motivation to live! After some time, I started to feel better and began recovering.”

A year later, Venera was diagnosed with tuberculosis and lung disintegration. At that time, the woman was pregnant. Since no one told her that during the pregnancy tuberculosis can be treated, Venera was advised to have an abortion.

“In the hospital they gave me the bed that was standing in the hallway, and soon the whole department knew I had tuberculosis,” Venera recalls. “People were scared of me. The gynaecologist was commenting something like, why people like me are even allowed to give births at all. That was such a humiliation!”

After she got out of the hospital, Venera realized that it does not matter what your position in the society is, the tuberculosis makes everyone equal. The woman became stronger and kinder, started to pay more attention to her relatives, helped those who needed help. Three years later, Venera gave birth to the healthy twins.

“I defeated tuberculosis. If you have such diagnosis, do not be not afraid and believe that you will recover!” says Venera. “Do not be scared of anyone, this is not a disgrace. Most importantly – do not refuse the treatment, otherwise you can infect your relatives and friends. Learn to love yourself!”

A DECISION TO LIVE

To those who only got to know about their diagnosis, Salavat advises to be strong and take care about their health

Salavat has been living with HIV since 2011. The man has heard something about this disease, but did not have a clear understanding of it. He thought it was somewhere far away, not here, and he could not even imagine that he could get infected.

“The doctor was calming me down, saying that people live with it, that it is not fatal, that in the future there probably will be a medicine… At first, of course, I felt bad, but I quickly overcame my fears,” Salavat says. “I made a decision to live. Now I know a lot about HIV. I am confident that I can work, and I am able to live. I know that we are the same people as everybody else, we are not infectious.”

To those who only got to know about their diagnosis, Salavat advises to be strong and take care about their health. It is very important to enjoy life, to share joy, and not to lapse into a cocoon of self-isolation.

ACCEPTING THE DIAGNOSIS

Oksana learned that she was HIV positive in the rehabilitation centre for drug addiction.

The acceptance of her diagnosis benefited Oksana’s professional and personal development

“It was scary, somehow I made myself believe that I had only five years left to live and I have to fill my last years with fun and unforgettable experience!” Oksana is saying. “Before my diagnosis, I thought that HIV is something that is far away and it is impossible to get it in Kazakhstan.”

At that time, the woman needed support, and she got it from her family. The first one who learned about her diagnosis was Oksana’s sister.

“Later I asked her what she felt when she found out that I was HIV positive,” Oksana remembers. “Surprisingly enough, most of all she was worried about me, because the first thing I could convince her in was that I had only five years to live. About three years later, I accepted my diagnosis. I realized that I am not dying, and started to learn how to live with HIV.”

The acceptance of the diagnosis did not only benefit Oksana’s professional development, but also her personal development.

“I am happy to be busy with my favourite things, I am with a person I love and my family is very friendly. I learned how to live with HIV. You just need take more care about your health and love life!” Oksana resumes.

TO BELIEVE IN RECOVERY

After being diagnosed, Sultanamurat started to appreciate life more

The only thing Sultanmurat knew about tuberculosis was that it is a dangerous disease. When he heard his diagnosis, he became horrified.

“I experienced haemoptysis. It was scary, but I did not even suspect that it could be tuberculosis. I thought that I had some problems with my internal organs,” recalls Sultanmurat. “I really wanted to be cured, but the treatment was going very difficult. In the beginning, I did not tolerate the medicine and developed allergies. I was fighting with myself, tried not to miss a single day of taking medications and injections. Now I feel much better.”

After being diagnosed, Sultanamurat started to appreciate life more, treated people who are ill with better understanding, began to appreciate and love his relatives even more.

“I would like to tell those who are diagnosed with tuberculosis that this disease is curable, like many other diseases. The main thing is to follow the regime in everything, do not miss taking pills and eat well, move and do sports, be friendly,” Sultanmurat says. “The most important thing is to believe in the best, that is, in your recovery.”

Join AFEW at Harm Reduction International Conference in Montréal

AFEW International is taking part in 25th Harm Reduction International Conference that will take place in Montréal, Canada next week. AFEW’s executive director Anke van Dam and program director Janine Wildschut will take part in the side event on harm reduction.

The side event ‘Future Proofing Harm Reduction’ is supported by the Dutch Funded Harm Reduction Programs – Bridging the Gaps, PITCH and the Alliance Integrated Harm Reduction Programme (AIHRP). These three alliances are represented by Aidsfonds, International HIV/AIDS Alliance, International Network of People Who Use Drugs, AFEW International, and the Mainline Foundation. The side event will take place on Monday, 15th May, 2-3.30 pm at Mansfield II, Entry hall, Centre Mont-Royal.

AFEW will be represented by the talk by AFEW International’s program director Janine Wildschut with the talk ‘Shrinking space for civil society in the EECA region’ and AFEW Kyrgyzstan’s director Natalya Shumskaya who will talk about women who use drugs in Kyrgyzstan. More detailed program of the side event can be found here.

Harm reduction goes much further than HIV prevention, and contributes significantly to the quality of life of people who use drugs and to the realization of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDG). This side event, moderated by the Dutch Ambassador for Sexual and Reproductive Health and Rights and HIV/AIDS Lambert Grijns, will share examples from the variety of grassroots harm reduction projects currently funded by the Netherlands. Current challenges in harm reduction funding beyond HIV and framing programmes within the context of the SDGs will be discussed.

The theme of this year’s Harm Reduction International Conference is ‘At the Heart of the Response’, and the programme includes presentations, panels, workshops and dialogue space sessions on innovative harm reduction services, new or ground-breaking research, effective or successful advocacy campaigns and key policy discussions or debates.

Communities will be Educated how to Analyse Data and how to Act

Two new modules for the program community-based participant research CBPR [e] Education that is supporting and strengthening the research capacity of organizations acting on behalf of and representing the interests of communities in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) are released online today.

The program consists of the number of activities, including training for community-based participatory research, small grants program, workshop on dissemination and abstract writing and workshop on presenting research findings on AIDS2018 Conference.

AFEW International gives program participants the opportunity to take part in online e-learning modules for further development of their research skills. The modules are also available for others who are interested in community-based participatory research. Course that costs 75 euros, includes 7 modules on the preparation and conduct of community-based participatory research.

The first module announced today is Data Analysis. Analyzing data is necessary to make sense of the outcomes of the study and to answer the research questions. Analyzing data will help working towards a way of representing the data to a larger public.

The second module is called Bringing about social change: translating knowledge into action. After the data is collected and analyzed, the participant is ready to write the reports and to disseminate the results to others. It is the time now to determine how the participant can bring social change that will benefit the community. The evaluation of the research will be also discussed in this module.

Later on, everyone will be able to participate in the webinar on data analysis, which will be held in late spring or summer of 2017.

Roman Dudnik: “People with HIV and Tuberculosis are the Same as We Are”

A photo exhibition dedicated to the World Tuberculosis Day will be opened in Almaty, Kazakhstan on March 18. The purpose of this exhibition is to show that people living with HIV or tuberculosis are the same as everyone else. This exhibition is one of the first important public events held by AFEW-Kazakhstan in 2017. We are talking about this and discussing other plans for this year with the executive director of AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan, Roman Dudnik.

– How was the year of 2016 for you? What were the new and exciting things that happened?

– Even though the year of 2016 was difficult, it was successful for us. We moved to a different office. Before, we were in the small office building. Now we are in the new building with much more space. The repairs were made based on our requirements, using our colours. There is a very good energy here, and it helps to work good.
In 2016 we finished the first part of the project HIV React that is financed by USAID/Central Asia, and we got the extension for the next three years. This is our main project. It is regional: we work in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Being the part of this project, we are working in preventing HIV among injecting drug users in prisons. We also work with people living with HIV who are getting ready to be released, and those who are already released. With specially developed START plus program, we prepare a person for his release two months before it happens, and then continue to work with a person for another four months after the release. Additionally, we train medical and non-medical staff of correctional facilities and employees of non-governmental organizations. This program is unique and does not work in many countries of the world. All efforts are aimed at preventing HIV infection and supporting those who live with HIV. The main goal, of course, is to encourage a person to get tested for HIV. If the test is positive, then we send a person to the AIDS centre, and we motivate him to start treatment with antiretroviral medicine, if necessary. We also help to restore needed documents, find jobs, renew social connections. This program is unique because it has a human face. We are aimed at a specific person, at solving of his or her problems. We also try to form skills so that people can solve their problems in the future themselves.

– Working in three countries in Central Asia with the same groups of population in HIV React project, can you observe the common tendencies?

– The general trends in all three countries are that HIV in places of detention exists, and the number of new cases of HIV transmission is increasing. Convicts is the group that requires intense attention and constant work. There is a very high level of stigma from prison staff. Of course, the reason for this is a lack of information, and this is what we are trying to correct through the trainings. The most successful project is implemented in Kyrgyzstan, where the criminal executive system is more open and sympathetic to such activities. In Kazakhstan and Tajikistan it is a little more difficult, but despite this, we manage to work and implement all planned activities within the framework of the project.

– Besides this, what were other projects that you worked on in 2016? 

– Since January we started with the new City Health project with the financial support of the Global Fund, where the main grant recipient is the International Charitable Foundation “Alliance for Public Health”. The project works in five cities of the EECA region. We are responsible for work in Almaty. Implementing this project, we will involve the city administration in the prevention of HIV infection among vulnerable groups: injecting drug users, men who have sex with men, and sex workers. We plan to create a city council on HIV/AIDS. We know that the project is not simple, but it is interesting for us. For Almaty, the project is very important, since it is the most populated city in the country, and the problem of HIV infection is especially relevant here. It will be important for us to make this a successful model and to duplicate this experience to other cities and countries.

– A year ago you had a school of tolerance, the goal of which was to reduce stigma on the part of health care providers. Please, tell us if you can see the results of this school?

– It is difficult and too early to talk about the results. Stigma and discrimination are big problems for Kazakhstan and whole Central Asia, and this is one of our main areas of work. One school of tolerance cannot solve this issue. Without any doubt, there is a big difference in how people come to the training, and what they think after three or five days of the training. In our training, we focus on the personal qualities of a person, perform the situations when the participant himself acts as a client or the representative of a vulnerable group, and is experiencing everything what the client is experiencing by himself. Human intolerance was formed long ago, and one year of work cannot change it. Nevertheless, there is already some progress in this field.

– On the 18th of March you will have the photo exhibition dedicated to the World Tuberculosis Day. Please, tell us more about it.

– The exhibition is intersecting with the topic of stigma and discrimination. We invite everybody to come and see it. It will be held from 18 to 31 of March in the gallery June 24. During the exhibition, there will be master classes, lectures, and talks with people who are depicted on the photos. On the photos, there are 15 Kazakhstani people who live with HIV, or who were cured of tuberculosis. The name of the exhibition Life in the Shadow speaks for itself, because due to the human ignorance, the heroes of our photos should hide their diagnosis from others and live with their problem alone in fear. Now they have opened their faces for the exhibition and they are not afraid to share their experiences. By each photo, there is a written piece with the story of the person: what he was going through, what he was thinking about. The purpose of the exhibition is to shed light on everyday life of people affected by HIV and tuberculosis. They are just like us. The only difference is that they know their diagnosis and they have to fight for their health. Myths and prejudices about HIV and tuberculosis make them hide this part of their lives. Although, the understanding and support of others is what helps them to defeat the disease. The exhibition is positive; people are smiling on the photos. We made only colour photos that show people in everyday life: in the flower shop, in the metro, during painting. During the exhibition, we will tell the visitors about HIV and tuberculosis, tolerance. We will also distribute flyers with the information about where you can bring, for example, bags with clothes that are no longer needed and help people who live with HIV in such a way.

– Even though it is almost the end of the first quarter of 2017, I still would like to ask you about the plans of AFEW-Kazakhstan for this year.

– We plan to work with our projects further. In April, we will be having big regional training about gender violence. We already invited a very good professional in this field to be our trainer. This is a new topic for us, and everything new is interesting for us.

Community-based Participatory Researches are Starting

IMG_114226 applications out of 44 were selected in the small grants programme to support community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia (EECA) region. The small grants fund is part of a wider programme to build the research capacity of community based organisations in EECA region and increase meaningful participation of the region at the AIDS2018.  The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs provides financial support to the programme.

The supported applicants are from 10 countries of the EECA region: Ukraine, Tajikistan, Kyrgyzstan, Kazakhstan, Moldova, Belarus, Armenia, and Uzbekistan. They represent the following target groups: people who use drugs, people who live with HIV, sex workers, HIV positive women, MSM, transgender people, prisoners, and LGBT.

The total grant fund for the proposals is €230,000. “Previously we announced that the fund was €120,000, but we managed to get more funding and that is how we can afford implementing more projects,” project manager Aids2018EECA in AFEW International Daria Alexeeva is saying.

The grant winners will soon start to implement their researches in their countries. It is expected to have the results of the CBPR in the fall of 2017.

AIDS Foundation East-West becomes AFEW International

ImprimirAIDS Foundation East-West, an international network of civil society organisations that is dedicated to improving the health of key populations, has changed its name to AFEW International.

A new logo and communication strategy have been created, and now they are part of the organisation’s identity. “With this new name we keep the recognisability and our brand as many partners in the field already know us,” says the executive director of AFEW International Anke van Dam. “With the new name we also acknowledge that we do more than HIV and AIDS. AFEW has built a track record for projects on TB, viral hepatitis and sexual and reproductive health and rights as well. AFEW strives to social inclusion of the key populations at risk and a healthy future of Eastern Europe and Central Asia!”

AFEW is dedicated to improving the health of key populations in society. With a focus on Eastern Europe and Central Asia, AFEW strives to promote health and increase access to prevention, treatment and care for major public health concerns such as HIV, TB, viral hepatitis, and sexual and reproductive health.

AFEW International is an uniquely positioned organisation as one of the few HIV, TB, hepatitis and sexual and reproductive health and rights organisations working in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. This is a region where the work is critical, as HIV and sexually transmitted infections are on the rise, sexuality education is deficient and gender-based violence goes largely unrecognized. Further, cases of multidrug resistant and extensive drug resistant tuberculosis are increasing; and there is a very high prevalence of hepatitis C. The group with the highest risk for HIV and HIV related diseases are people who use drugs. However, transmission through sexual contact is increasing and the prevalence among women and men who have sex with men is increasing.

U.S. Government Introduces New Drug to Help Save Lives of TB Patients in Tajikistan

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Source: Asia-Plus

Acting Deputy Chief of Mission of the United States to Tajikistan Lucy Jilka on January, 31 joined the First Deputy Minister of Health and Social Protection of Population of Tajikistan Saida Umarzoda, national health leadership, physicians, TB doctors, and stakeholders to celebrate the introduction of bedaquiline to Tajikistan. This is the first new drug approved for the treatment of tuberculosis (TB) since the 1960s.

According to the U.S. Embassy in Dushanbe, U.S. company Janssen Pharmaceuticals, a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson, created bedaquiline to treat drug-resistant tuberculosis and protect public health. Janssen is donating 30,000 courses of this life-saving new TB drug to qualified countries.  The United States, through USAID’s Office of Global Health, is partnering with Janssen to introduce bedaquiline in Tajikistan.

Tajikistan is on the list of countries with a high prevalence of multi-drug resistant TB, and has growing numbers of patients with extensively drug-resistant TB, for which there was no effective treatment available within the country.  Bedaquiline, also called by its brand name Sirturo, offers a better chance to cure patients with these forms of TB and will help reduce the transmission of drug-resistant tuberculosis in the community.

USAID is leading the free distribution of this lifesaving medication through its Bedaquiline Donation Program in collaboration with Tajikistan’s Republican Center for TB Control, the Ministry of Health and Social Protection of Population, and other partners to introduce the new drug, build capacity to expand treatment, and pilot new shorter treatment options for drug-resistant tuberculosis.  A key international partner in these efforts is the Challenge TB Project, which is implemented by the Dutch TB Foundation, KNCV.

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Source: Asia-Plus

Bedaquiline received accelerated approval for use in the United States in December 2012, and it is used to treat Americans with drug-resistant TB.  In Tajikistan, per World Health Organization recommendations, fifty patients were initially enrolled in treatment courses containing bedaquiline, with one hundred and fifty more to begin treatment during 2017. The progress of treatment will be monitored by trained specialists at designated treatment centers.

The Challenge TB Project is one of the many assistance projects made possible by the American people through USAID. Over the last 25 years, the U.S. Embassy in Dushanbe has provided more than $1.8 billion in programs that support Tajikistan’s security, democratic institutions, social sector, and economic growth.  In February, Tajikistan and America will celebrate 25 years of diplomatic relations.

Source: Asia-Plus 

Natalya Shumskaya: “We Want to Improve Country Health System Coordinating Mechanisms”

shumskayaPublic Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West in the Kyrgyz Republic” makes a significant contribution to public health of the country in reducing the growth rate of socially significant infections in Kyrgyzstan. The head of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan Natalya Shumskaya is telling what we should expect from the organisation in 2017, and outlines the achievements of the previous year.

 – How was the year of 2016 for AFEW-Kyrgyzstan? What do you think were your greatest successes?

– 2016 was a successful and fruitful for our organization. We managed to keep our activities on HIV prevention in the prison system, including law enforcement, prevention of HIV among women who use drugs. During the last year, 1013 women received an access to health and social services. One of the achievements was that in 2016 our organization supported the Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic in the development of the clinical protocol “Pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal period for women who use drugs.” In December of the last year this protocol was adopted. Later, we started a very difficult project with the aim to return the patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) to the treatment. Since August 2016, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan together with the City Centre for Tuberculosis Control in Bishkek started a project “Joint control of tuberculosis and HIV in Kyrgyz Republic.” During five months of 2016, 17 MDR-TB patients returned for the treatment; three patients co-infected with HIV were connected to antiretroviral treatment, five patients with tuberculosis and extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB) had the necessary tests, and their results were given to the council for inclusion in a treatment program under the new scheme. There was organized controlled treatment at home for 28 patients. The delivery of products is done 6 days a week, except Sundays. Additionally, project case managers conduct information sessions with patients with MDR-TB and their inner social circle, monitor the side effects of anti-TB drugs, and, if necessary, deliver drugs to relieve the side effects. They also maintain regular contact with doctors. In January of 2017 we increased project staff. It was done for the full coverage of all MDR-TB patients who need to receive treatment at home and assisting them to diagnosis and friendly services. Two case managers and a social worker were hired.

– How is the work of the research department of your organization that you created two years ago?

– The Department continues to work successfully. Over the past year, the researchers conducted a qualitative study among the inmates of correctional facilities that are getting ready to be released. It was called “Prisons, injecting drugs and the environment of risk of HIV infection.” This is a continuation of the positive experience of effective cooperation of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan with medical school researchers from Yale University and the State Penitentiary Service of the Kyrgyz Republic. This study aims to describe and research the quality of the program of methadone substitution treatment in the penitentiary system of Kyrgyzstan and civil society. The recommendations based on those results will be offered to the country to optimize harm reduction programs.

– One of the main directions of your work is cooperation with the police and the prison systems. Please tell us, how is this cooperation going? What is the role of AFEW in it?

– AFEW cooperates with the Ministry of Internal Affairs for 10 years already. In 2016 our organization has provided technical support to the Ministry in carrying out monitoring visits to all the regions of the country. The aim of the visits was to control how the law enforcement officers perform the instruction on HIV prevention. In addition, we organized and conducted four trainings for the staff responsible for the official trainings and for non-governmental organizations on the reform of law enforcement agencies. It is important that the civil sector supports current reforms, and it is important that law enforcement officers assist the execution of the State Programme on HIV.

AFEW is also working with the penitentiary system of the country for more than 10 years. We work together in three areas: technical assistance and coordination, increasing the capacity of staff and providing direct services to prisoners. In 2016 we worked first in six and then in four institutions to promote the goal 90-90-90. We provided services for people who inject drugs (PIDs), told them about HIV and the ways of transmission, motivated them to pass the test for HIV. We actively worked with people living with HIV at the stages of realising of the diagnosis, preparation for therapy, start of therapy, development of adherence to treatment. One of the achievements, of course, is to extend the work on the colony-settlements. Before, prisoners there fell of HIV prevention services, as there are no medical units there, and they usually have no documents for getting help from the civilian health organizations.

– In October AFEW-Kyrgyzstan helped to sign a memorandum of cooperation of four key groups. Please, tell us what these groups are and why their teamwork is so important? How is this cooperation going now?

– Unfortunately, there is mutual stigma within the key groups. Cooperation can help to overcome barriers and build partnerships. The leaders of key groups started to work closer. They discuss new joint projects, research abstracts for AIDS2018 conference in Amsterdam. Together they will carry out activities to reduce stigma and discrimination in relation to other key groups through the mini-session, for example, PIDs for LGBT and sex workers’ organizations. Since last year, we have been inviting all the participants of memorandum for the event and, of course, they also invite us for their events.

– In February, you will host a training for the members of the Country Coordinating Committee on HIV/AIDS (CCC) project BACK UP-Health. Tell us more about it. What are other areas of your work with the CCC?

– Starting from July 2016, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan will implement the project “Harmonization and consolidation of resources to fight HIV infection and tuberculosis in Kyrgyzstan.” It will be done with the financial support of GIZ, program Back Up-Health. With this project we want to improve the coordination mechanisms in the country’s health care system. We want to involve civil society in the discussion on the reform of CCC, and we also want to increase the capacity of the Committee. In February of 2017 AFEW-Kyrgyzstan plans to host a seminar for members of the CCC to prepare the Country Request for continued funding in the state funding for 2018-2020. The following groups will take part in the seminar: members of the Committee for the preparation of applications for resource mobilization and harmonization of CCC; CCC board; members of the Advisory Working Group, which were included by the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health; national experts who work on the preparation of the request for continued funding who will directly collect information and write application; international consultant; head of the expert working group on writing requests for funding, and also key partners from the public and international sectors which may influence decisions and who expressed their readiness to provide technical assistance in the preparation of high-quality country request to the state financing from Kyrgyzstan. During the workshop, participants will act as experts and will share their knowledge and experience with each another. They will also learn how to fill the forms for the requests, will learn the new priority areas of TB and HIV, which are included in national policies and programs, will discuss and analyse the share of public funding, make mapping of the services, clients and funding. Actually, the main purpose of this seminar is to assist the CCC, experts and other stakeholders in the preparation of high-quality application. We want everyone to have one vision and one structure of the request, so that the process of approval of the CCC members is efficient and fast.

– What are AFEW-Kyrgyzstan plans for the year of 2017?

– AFEW-Kyrgyzstan spent its first three years as a local non-governmental organization. The most important achievement is that we were able to successfully implement its first strategic plan and to develop partnerships with international and donor organizations. In 2017 we will review the strategic plan of the organization. Of course, the priority for the board of the organization has been and continues to be ensuring of the stability of the organization.

Call for Abstracts: Hepatitis-C Community Summit in Amsterdam

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AFEW International is glad to announce the call for abstracts for Hepatitis-C Community Summit that will take place in Amsterdam in April of 2017.

With the new medicines now available an opportunity exists to completely eradicate hepatitis C.  However,  a crucial factor for success will be the involvement of people living with hepatitis C. Also it will require pharmaceutical companies, governments, doctors, and health purchasers to come together to ensure these medicines are quickly available to all.

Please submit your abstract about innovative approaches, community initiatives, successful advocacy examples, successful ‘from research to practice’ examples before the 19th of February. You will be informed about acceptance at the end of February.

The meeting takes place in the heart of Amsterdam. A number of well known speakers already confirmed their participation.
You can find more information at www.hepatitiscommunitysummit.eu

The team of supporting organisations:

Correlation Network Hepatitis C Initiative

European Aids Treatment Group (EATG)

European African Treatment Advocates Network (EATAN)

European Network of People Who Use Drugs (EuroNPUD)

European Lever Patient Association (ELPA)

International Doctors for Healthier Drug Policy (IDHDP)

Aids Foundation East West

Alliance for Public Health, Ukraine

Fixpunkt, Germany

Hepatitis Info, Nederland

Prometheus Foundation, Greece

Reasons for Drug Policy Reform

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Text: Michel Kazatchkine, UN secretary general special envoy on HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Why is eastern Europe the only region in the world that still has a growing HIV epidemic? In one of the region’s countries, Russia, more than two thirds of all HIV infections, and 55% of the near 100 000 new infections reported last year, resulted from drug injection.

Some 3.2 million people in eastern Europe inject drugs, and about 1.5 million of them are in Russia. In 2007 the number of newly reported HIV cases among Russian people who inject drugs (12 538) was similar to the number in the rest of eastern Europe (12 026). But since then the numbers have diverged hugely.

Scaling up of harm reduction programmes in several countries coincided with a stabilising of HIV rates—and fewer than 7000 new cases outside Russia in 2014. In Russia, however, where access to sterile needles and syringes is low and opioid substitutes remain illegal and unavailable, the number of people who inject drugs newly infected with HIV climbed to nearly 22 500 in 2014.

Criminalisation of drug use

The reasons for Russia’s high figures include the prohibition and effective criminalisation of drug use, repressive law enforcement, and stigma around drug use. These factors lead people to inject in unsafe conditions for fear of police and arrests and result in needle sharing and overdose.

In 2015, the United Nations’ secretary general, Ban Ki-Moon, called for “careful rebalancing of the international policy on controlled drugs.”

“We must consider alternatives to criminalisation and incarceration of people who use drugs,” he said. “We should increase the focus on public health, prevention, treatment, and care.”

The World Health Organization, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and UNAIDS jointly recommend a package of harm reduction interventions as best practice to reduce the risk of acquiring, and improve treatment of, HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis among people who inject drugs. Such strategies, which do not require prohibition of harmful behaviours, are key to reducing death and disease because drug dependency is characterised by people’s inability to abstain.

Continue reading here.