AFEW International Releases Report on Its Activities for AIDS 2018 Conference

AFEW Network (AFEW)  has a long history of working to link the “east” with the “west” so when the decision was made to hold the 22nd International AIDS conference (AIDS 2018) in Amsterdam, the city that is home to AFEW International, the secretariat of AFEW Network, it was clear that AFEW could have an important role in leveraging the conference to bring global attention to the crisis situation in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). Starting from 2016, with the support of the Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs (MoFA), various strategies (fostering linking, learning and dialogue; developing creative solutions to unresolved challenges; influencing leaders, policymakers and donors; addressing stigma, discrimination and criminalization of people affected by HIV) were undertaken as to empower communities from the EECA to take part in AIDS 2018.

Leading up to and during AIDS 2018, AFEW International engaged in a range of activities to promote EECA at the conference and to promote the conference in EECA. An independent evaluator examined the impact of the implemented activities and factors that contributed to the successes and analyzed the challenges. In the report, you can read what were the key activities and lesson learned.

The short version of the report can be read here.

The full version of the report can be read here.

Videos from AIDS 2018 и IAS 2017 Now Available in Russian

Videos from AIDS 2018 and IAS 2017 Now Available in Russian. The IAS Educational Fund provides educational and inspiring sessions from IAS conferences (International AIDS Conferences and IAS Conferences on HIV Science) to clinicians and other healthcare providers and advocates. To make content accessible to more people, the IAS Educational Fund provides several sessions subtitled and transcribed in FrenchSpanishPortuguese and Russian.

You can find the sessions from AIDS 2018 Conference with the subtitles in Russian here.

Source: www.iasociety.org

AFEW on AIDS 2018: Cases and Efforts to Spotlight Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

AFEW International and AFEW Network have organised and supported numerous activities within 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018. AFEW joined many initiatives by other organisations and networks and presented successful cases of work in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA). Find some highlights below.

Together with EECA regional networks and committed advocates, AFEW has put great effort into making sure that the AIDS crisis and related public health concerns in EECA were featured in the conference program. Each plenary session of the AIDS 2018 had a speaker from the region and lots of sessions addressed the challenges in stopping new HIV and TB cases in the EECA countries. AFEW also supported Russian-speaking delegates to the Conference and helped with translation to and from Russian during AIDS 2018. More than 35 sessions were translated into Russian. A team of 25 dedicated Russian and English-speaking volunteers was recruited, trained and coordinated by AFEW International. These volunteers have provided language support during the conference and at the events organised by AFEW.

AFEW has also contributed with financial and technical support to the EECA networking zone ActivEast which was one of the busiest zones in the Global Village with more than 50 sessions during the conference led by community leaders.

Besides, AFEW International helped Amsterdam Youth Force by providing it with fiscal and administrative support, technical assistance and financial means to bring young volunteers to the conference. 35 young people from different countries of EECA have travelled to Amsterdam by bus from Kyiv and have worked at youth-focused events of the Global Village.

A migrant from Tajikistan came to talk

AFEW’s Leadership workshop ‘Migration in Eastern Europe and Central Asia: Access to healthcare for all?’ presented information about migrants in EECA, and labor migrants from Tajikistan in particular. Findings from a needs assessment survey of labour migrants among people who use drugs in Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan were presented.

A labor migrant from Tajikistan Zebo Alimahmadova came to Amsterdam to tell about her migration experience to Russia. Working in Saint-Petersburg, Zebo got to know that she was HIV-positive. Even though it was difficult for her, she found strength to go back to her home country with her children and get the proper treatment. Now she has a job and feels support from her three kids and AFEW-Tajikistan.

Coping with shrinking space

Shrinking space of civil society in the EECA region was also an important topic during many events of the Conference. AFEW’s director of programme Janine Wildschut led an active discussion on the strategies for coping with shrinking space for the civil society and shared AFEW’s techniques in the EECA networking zone in the Global Village.

“In EECA, we have observed a diminishing space for civil society organisations, perhaps best exampled by the ‘Foreign Agent Law’ in the Russian Federation. The shrinking civil society space threatens the effectiveness of the response to HIV and other public health issues, particularly as it pertains to the health and rights of key populations,” says Janine Wildschut.

The report on the coping strategies amongst resilient harm reduction organisations and community networks in the context of shrinking space for civil society in Eastern Europe and Central Asia can be read and downloaded here.

Martine de Schutter Fund donors meeting

Martine de Schutter Scholarship Fund event was organised during the AIDS 2018 to bring together the donors of the Fund and the scholars and give them an opportunity to meet the family of Martine. The Fund established by AFEW raised 130.000 EUR to cover the additional scholarships of the EECA applicants to come to Amsterdam for the AIDS Conference. It was an emotional gathering, with gratitude expresses by the scholars for an opportunity to come to the conference – for many for the first time in their lives. AFEW’s executive director Anke van Dam said that AFEW has an intention to continue fundraising for the Fund to further support EECA delegates for international scientific meetings and conferences.

Martine de Schutter was a strong Dutch advocate for human rights and had a passion to Eastern Europe and Central Asia. Her last trip was to AIDS 2014 Conference in Melbourne on the MH17 plane that was shot down and crashed.

EECA ministers showed their political will

Within AIDS 2018, AFEW took part in Ministers and civil society dialogue meeting, organized by the World Health Organization Regional Office for Europe and UNAIDS, in cooperation with the Government of the Netherlands. Ministers of health and senior policy-makers from 10 countries in EECA were introduced to the civil society organisations’ representatives during the meeting. The participants exchanged their experiences and the results of their national AIDS responses with a view to adapting them and scaling them up across the region. They discussed the Fast-Track priorities for achieving the 90–90–90 targets. EECA government representatives reaffirmed their political commitment to scale up national HIV responses during a ministerial policy dialogue on HIV, which was held on the eve of the International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam, Netherlands.

Hermitage dinner as the climax of Culture Initiative events

AFEW established International Cultural Initiative – a platform to complement AFEW’s consolidated track record in advocacy, education and outreach campaigns on matters of public health in the EECA region. The artistic work put forward by our six artists-in-residence, who came from EECA countries, was showcased at a variety of cultural institutions of the city of Amsterdam between May and July 2018. During the AIDS Conference, art-pieces were accessible to the general public in the Global Village.

The special Dialogue Dinner was the climax of AFEW’s cultural activities, taking place in the Hermitage Amsterdam Museum. We hosted an evening with dialogues about the EECA region, while savouring food and art from the region. 60 invitees representing policy makers, researchers, NGOs, foundations and international development specialists focusing on public health in the EECA region attended the dinner.

Chasing the virus together

AFEW Network members were actively participating in the EECA Campaign “Chase the virus not people!” that was launched at AIDS 2018 by the region’s community networks. EECA regional networks joined forces in response to the current situation to urge the world to overcome discrimination and the stigmatisation of key populations. AFEW International joined the campaign and was also one of its organisers.

“It was very important for us to join this campaign because this is the first campaign in which all regional networks united their efforts to draw attention to the problems of key population groups. AFEW is also against the backdrop of the catastrophic situation with the HIV/AIDS epidemic in EECA,” says Daria Alexeeva, EECA at AIDS2018 project manager at AFEW International. “Being actively present in six countries of the region, we realize how important it is to unite our efforts with other networks to achieve the common goal.”

AIDS Conference Brought me a Job in Tajikistan

Author: Nargis Hamrabaeva, Tajikistan

Fifty-year-old Zebo from a southern region of Tajikistan – Khatlon – is a former labour migrant. At the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam (AIDS 2018), she had the courage to speak out about what she long kept in – her HIV-positive status. Zebo once again turned the attention of the international community to the fact that labour migrants are one of the populations most vulnerable to HIV.

We interviewed her in Amsterdam, right after she delivered a speech at one of the sessions dedicated to HIV in the context of labour migration.

– Zebo, why did you decide to go to Russia to earn money? Usually that is what men do.

– In 2004, after I divorced my husband, I was left alone with three small children – my elder siblings were 9 and 6 years old, and my smallest daughter was only 3 months old. I worked as a nurse at a local maternity clinic. My children grew up, with our expenses growing along the way, and my earnings were not enough to feed them all. My ex-husband had a new family and was not helping us. Many of my countrymen went abroad to earn money and support their families. I decided to do the same. That is how my children and I found our way to Saint Petersburg.

– Isn’t it difficult for a woman to be a labour migrant?

– It is very difficult. I was desperate and went to nowhere. For the first days, we slept at the railway station or in the street. Some strangers helped us, offering food or money. Once, a woman from Tajikistan, who worked in Saint Petersburg, saw us and was so kind to give shelter to my children and me. I started baking and selling pasties, earned some money. As time passed, more people were buying our pasties: I was baking and my elder daughter was selling them at the Sadovy street market. Luckily, we had many buyers. However, I had to work my fingers to the bone.

I tried to settle my personal life again as it was very hard for me to cope with all my troubles alone. I met a young man. In the beginning, everything was fine. Then I started noticing him doing some strange things. It turned out that he was a drug user. He injected drugs. I asked him to stop but it did not help. Then I decided to break up with him. Later I heard that he felt bad and his relatives took him back to his motherland. Since then, I have never heard from this man, but my HIV status always reminds me of him.

When did you first learn that you had HIV?

– In 2015, a year after I broke up with my partner. All of a sudden, I felt bad and had a fever. My relatives called an ambulance. In the hospital, they made some tests and I was diagnosed with HIV. In a month, I felt better and went back home, but six months later it happened again. I was dwindling, with my weight going down to 34 kilos. Doctors advised me to go back to my country and get treatment. Almost all my countrymen working in Saint Petersburg had to raise money to buy airline tickets for me and my children. They knew that I was severely ill but did not know the exact diagnosis. When I came home, my family knew I had HIV. They did not really welcome me back. My relatives turned their backs on me and asked me to leave our house. My mother said that I would infect everyone, told people not to eat from the same plate with me and not to shake hands with me. I remember her yelling: “Get out of the house, aidsy!” It hurt me to hear such words, especially from my own mother. Still there are kind people in this world, so a neighbour living opposite from my parent’s house offered me to stay with her. She gave me a small room in a little building. That is where I still live.

So you had to go back to square one again?

– Yes, I did. A woman I know told me about AFEW-Tajikistan office in Bokhtar. I went there and they received me well, helping with food and treatment. They also had a business workshop for the members of vulnerable populations and I was able to get a credit from a microfinance organization. I bought everything I needed to open a small sales outlet in the neighbourhood. Sometimes, when I need to go to the city, my daughter takes over my duties. Children always help and support me in everything I do. My son also assists street market vendors, bringing home 15 somoni a day (less than two US dollars – ed. note). After my speech at the Amsterdam conference, Director of AFEW-Tajikistan Ikrom Ibragimov offered me to work as a consultant in the Bokhtar office of the organization. Now I will receive a salary. I am so grateful to him and to all the members of his great team. With their support, my life is getting better.

Great! One more question about Amsterdam. What does participation in the AIDS conference mean to you?

– It is my first trip far abroad. It is also the first time I take part in such a conference. I listened to many speakers and was inspired by their stories. They were openly saying that they lived with HIV for 20-25 years, taking care of their health and living active and complete lives. It gave me strength and confidence. I was startled to learn that in many countries people living with HIV are not prosecuted and other people do not avoid them. In those several days of the conference, I received more sincere hugs and handshakes than I did since I learned about my diagnosis. Why is there such a strong stigma against people living with HIV in my country? Why do people still hold to stereotypes and are afraid of us? At one of the sessions of the Amsterdam conference, I heard a slogan: “Chase the virus, not people.” It is such a good point! 

AIDS 2018: Will Decriminalisation Resolve the Problem of HIV

Maybe one of the most important sessions at the recent 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 held in Amsterdam was the session, which raised the question why we still fail in responding to the epidemic among people who inject drugs. Participants of the session were able to consider this problem from the different points of view: science, law enforcement and community of people who use drugs.

Methadone is good for police

For over 20 years, Professor Nick Crofts from the University of Melbourne has been working to engage police in HIV response. He considers that decriminalisation is an absolute necessity to resolve the problem.

“We fail responding to the epidemic because we have failed to enlist police as partners in the response to HIV,” he says. “Changing the situation, first of all, requires changing the role of police, which will, in turn, help bringing the marginalized communities back to the society.”

In Australia, Professor Crofts and his allies were able to convince the police that such harm reduction programmes as methadone therapy and syringe exchange may benefit police as well as the rest of the community.

“We still have not introduced harm reduction courses in police academies, have not adequately educated police and have not fostered the role of peer educators, which is important not only in the traditional environment of activists, but also in such specific group as future or current police officers. Police officers may listen only to other police officers,” says Nick Crofts with a smile.

HIV for culture change

It is essential to find police officers who support the idea of harm reduction and educate them so that they can then educate their colleagues in relevant agencies.

“Find at least one or two individuals who want to do something different! Find them and give them your support!” exclaims Professor Crofts.

HIV may be a starting point to change the culture of the police. For a start, we need to engage the police, hold joint workshops with people from civil society and police, foster gender diversity in the police (to recruit more female police officers) and, finally, include harm reduction into the programme of police academies.

However, the Professor points out that it may sound pie in the sky talking about police in some countries.

“A third of them understand harm reduction, a third can understand and another third will never understand. Our goal is to find those people who understand or can understand it and work with them until they outnumber those who will never understand harm reduction,” he says.

“Narcotic ration” for Russia

Dr. M-J Milloy, the epidemiologist from Vancouver, tells about an interesting case, which occurred in his city back in the 1990s. Back then, there was already a large needle and syringe exchange programme in Vancouver and methadone was available. The epidemic among people who use drugs had successfully been curbed, but suddenly there was an unexpected outbreak of new HIV cases. How could it happen in a city with a well-developed harm reduction programme? It was explained with the fact that people could not access the necessary services when they were incarcerated.

Epidemiologists found out that incarceration was one of the key factors increasing the risk of HIV acquisition and one in five new HIV cases in Vancouver was a result of incarceration.

At the same time, experts estimate that in Russia every hour ten people are infected with HIV, while tuberculosis is the main reason of mortality among those who live with HIV. Most of them are people who inject drugs. The country does not offer evidence-based treatment to people who use drugs, i.e. there is no methadone, which, according to a recent statement from the Russian Ministry of Foreign Affairs, is a “narcotic ration.”

AIDS 2018: Engaging Young People who use Drugs in the HIV and Human Rights Response in Ukraine

Source: www.aids2018.org

Ukraine presented its experience in engaging young people who use drugs in the HIV and human rights response during International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 in Amsterdam. Organisations ACO “Convictus Ukraine”, ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine), CF “Return to Life” and CF “KCF “Blago” shared the results of their work.

Club for teenagers

The main purpose of the activity in the framework of the PITCH project is to prevent the spread of HIV and other dangerous diseases among vulnerable adolescents and to develop healthy lifestyle habits, the director of “Convictus Ukraine” Yevheniia Kuvshynova is saying.

In their work, “Convictus” team is actively using mobile clinic where they provide services for teenagers. A multidisciplinary team is operating on the basis of a mobile clinic. The mobile clinic helps them to bring the services to those who are not covered with prevention and treatment programs. There is also a school of leaders and a Street power youth club, where teenagers can spend their leisure time and receive help from psychologist or social workers, get information, medical services, testing, etc. Around 500 teenagers received services in the club.

Accepted the monitoring tool

Iryna Nerubaieva

The project manager of the ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine) Iryna Nerubaieva shared the results of the piloting of the tool for monitoring the violations of human rights of most-at-risk adolescents which was developed and implemented in the framework of the project Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations. From January till December 2017 in four pilot cities, 792 interviews with adolescents and youth aged 14-21 were conducted. 430 adolescents were 14-18 years old. The number of cases of human rights violations registered in an online form was 92 of all surveyed. A young activist of the CF “Return to Life” Daria Kopyevska, a social worker of the CF “KCF “Blago”Alina Khokhlova and a lawyer and AFEW-Ukraine’s consultant Vita Musatenko also shared their experience.

“It is good to see that teenagers realized why they need this tool, and how social workers accepted it. Now they know how that it will help in their work,” Vita Musatenko is saying.

According to the latest estimates, the number of most-at-risk adolescents is 129 000, including 21 700 injection drug users. However, there is no official data on the exact number of most-at-risk adolescents, including underage drug users. In Ukraine, most-at-risk adolescents represent a very closed group, thus the lack of statistical data, stigma, discrimination and legal barriers make their access to HIV/STI services more complicated.

 

AFEW International Receives Grant from the Elton John AIDS Foundation

Sir Elton John during International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam

Author: Olesya Kravchuk, AFEW International

AFEW International received the Emergency Support Fund Manager grant from the Elton John AIDS Foundation. This news was announced during the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam. AFEW has got this grant together with AIDSfonds.

Within this ‘Emergency Support Fund Manager” grant, AFEW will use its long-lasting expertise and history in grant-making and support to strengthen the capacity of Community Based Organisations (CBOs) and Non-Governmental Organizations (NGOs) in Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) to overcome emergencies and to become stronger organisations.

Louise van Deth, Director of AIDSfgonds

“We are very honoured to receive this grant that will last three years,” says the executive director of AFEW International Anke van Dam. “Access to the treatment in Eastern Europe and Central Asia is a crucial need, particularly for key populations most at risk and people living with HIV. Unfortunately, not more than 30% of people living with HIV have access to the treatment. Stock outs of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) do happen, and the Emergency Support Fund is a great means to avoid this.”

AFEW will disburse emergency grants to enable key populations CBOs and NGOs in Eastern Europe and Central Asia to survive emergency situations and to be prepared or avoid emergencies in the future. NGOs and CBOs often deal with emergency situations due to a restrictive legal environment for key populations at risk for HIV, stigma and discrimination of those groups and a limited space to operate as a CBO and NGO.

AFEW Network Issues Guide for AIDS 2018 Visitors

With 22nd International AIDS Conference approaching in about two weeks, AFEW Network issued a guide for AIDS 2018 visitors with the useful information. The guide provides general information about Amsterdam – the home city for AIDS 2018. It also has information on public transport, drug policy, medical services, police, culture in the Netherlands, and practical questions.

The guide is in English and Russian languages and it can be downloaded here.

Stigma Affects the Motivation for HIV Testing

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

As estimated by UNAIDS, 35 million people globally died of AIDS-associated diseases since the onset of the epidemic. People living with HIV die of tuberculosis, cancers, hepatitis… Meanwhile, there is no data on how many lives are lost to stigma. Today stigma is the strongest barrier for testing among those who are not aware of their status and for receiving services among people living with HIV (PLWH).

Migrant with HIV double stigma

Salavat Kabjalelov is an outreach worker and a peer consultant in the Zabota (‘Care’) Charitable Foundation. He helps labour migrants: offers consultations on HIV, tells about the need to get tested, navigates clients for diagnostics to the AIDS Centre and to the tuberculosis clinic. Salavat can find the right words for every client. He had no citizenship or registration, no access to antiretroviral treatment (ART) and he wanted to hide not only from his problems but also from hostile stares and rough remarks of people around him.

Salavat Kabjalelov

He and his wife lived a quiet life, not seeking medical care. For migrants, the main thing is their job, not their health. Then, three years ago something tragic happened. Salavat lost his wife. The young woman died of cancer.

“I tried to arrange hospice care for my wife. I was even ready to pay for it, but it was not possible. They refused me. She was living with HIV. It appeared that it was more important to be a citizen. If you had a severe disease, it was not an argument. The good news is that now the situation in Kazakhstan is improving and migrants with HIV will be provided with ART. However, it will not bring my wife back,” complains Salavat.

Everyone goes through self-stigma

Lyubov Chubukova

Lyubov Chubukova works in the Kazakhstan Union of People Living with HIV. She is a delicate woman of strong character, who can convince people both from the tribunes of international forums and in one-on-one arguments. Twelve years of living with HIV made her a leader. She experienced stigma in a private health centre where she came when she got pregnant – young and confused. An older woman gave her an advice – to seek health services only in the AIDS Centre. However, Lyubov says that her self-stigma was even stronger. Every person who learns about having HIV faces this problem.

“I no longer consider myself a victim as it makes it impossible for me to live and grow. Good support in fighting self-stigma is trusting people and knowing your rights. You have to live on, not restricting yourself, and overcome your fears. Otherwise, you may reach the worst point,” says Lyubov.

Lyubov does not hide her status. Vice versa, she often takes part in TV shows and open discussions as an expert. She is convinced that stigma affects the motivation for HIV testing. People are afraid to get tested for HIV as they are worried that their test may come back positive. At the same time, if a person living with HIV starts the therapy too late, the probability of treatment success is much lower and it can even lead to death of the patient.

Every tenth person living with HIV has suicidal thoughts

Three years ago, the Central Asian Association of People Living with HIV within the Leader of People Living with HIV Project funded by USAID for the first time in the region carried out a survey to assess the index of stigma in three Central Asian countries – Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan.

Results of the study in Kazakhstan showed that every tenth person living with HIV had suicidal thoughts. PLWH aged 30 and above suffer most from self-stigma as well as people with small (one to nine years) history of living with HIV. Self-discrimination mainly leads to the decision not to have any more children. Every third person living with HIV in the country makes such a decision.

The study demonstrated that the experience of injecting drug use as well as the experience of imprisonment were the drivers of stigma towards people living with HIV. Most often, PLWH faced discrimination from the side of health workers (first of all, refusal to provide health care) and public officials, while discrimination from the side of their immediate social environment was far less common. Moreover, the cases of discrimination were accumulated in the first ten years of a person living with HIV.

No silence about stigma

Baurzhan Bayserkin

The first step in overcoming stigma is to break the wall of silence. Approval of regulations at the country level is a real victory. In the beginning of the year, the National Plan to Fight Stigma and Discrimination against People Living with HIV was approved in Kazakhstan.

“Stigma and discrimination related to HIV status are the major barriers for PLWH to access prevention, care and support services. To end the spread of HIV, a focus should be made on the complete eradication of discrimination, first of all in health institutions. It will allow achieving a significant reduction in the growth of HIV epidemic,” says Baurzhan Bayserkin, General Director of the Republican AIDS Centre.

Kazakhstani are going to continue this discussion at the 22nd International AIDS Conference in Amsterdam AIDS 2018.

Movies That Matter on AIDS 2018

Lucky specials. Source: www.moviesthatmatter.nl

The 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS 2018 in Amsterdam, Netherlands provides a unique forum for the intersection of science, advocacy, and human rights. The Global Village of the Conference intersects with the main conference programme, blending scientific sessions with cultural activities, live performances, networking zones, NGO booths, marketplace booths, and art exhibits. The Global Village is open to the general public and creates a diverse and vibrant space where communities from all over the world gather to meet, share and learn from each other. 23-26 July Movies That Matter will present four films in The Global Village that match the themes of the conference.

Founded in March 2006, Movies that Matter followed the footsteps of the Amnesty International Film Festival. It continued and enhanced the festival’s activities, both in the Netherlands and abroad. Movies that Matter believes that film is a powerful weapon against social indifference. What cannot be accomplished by spoken and written language, can be achieved by motion picture. Cinema fascinates, stimulates, inspires and raises awareness. Films have an emotional appeal and serve as a mouthpiece for victims of injustice.

Movies that Matter film screenings are not complete without an expansion programme, in the form of debates, introductions, speeches or Q&A sessions. Human rights defenders, filmmakers, experts and representatives of social organisations jointly analyse the situations in which human rights are at stake in order to put things in perspective.

Film agenda on AIDS 2018

KIKI
Monday 23 July – 17:15
The film will be introduced by Maarten Stoltz, Program-Coordinator at Movies that Matter.

LUCKY SPECIALS
Tuesday 24 July – 18:30
In collaboration with THE UNION: International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease and KNCV Tuberculosis fund.
The film will be introduced by Emily T. Blitz, Global Director of Conferences and Summits at THE UNION.

WHO’S GONNA LOVE ME NOW?
Wednesday 25 July – 18:30
The film will be introduced by Dirk van der Straaten, Artistic Director at Movies that matter.

LITTLE HEAVEN
Thursday 26 July – 18:30
The film will be introduced by Mercy Ngulube, Young anti-AIDS activist and victim of AIDS.

Where: RAI Amsterdam, Amtrium first floor, room L103-104

Good to know: the programme is free and will be hosted in English

More information can be found here.