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AIDS Foundation East-West becomes AFEW International

ImprimirAIDS Foundation East-West, an international network of civil society organisations that is dedicated to improving the health of key populations, has changed its name to AFEW International.

A new logo and communication strategy have been created, and now they are part of the organisation’s identity. “With this new name we keep the recognisability and our brand as many partners in the field already know us,” says the executive director of AFEW International Anke van Dam. “With the new name we also acknowledge that we do more than HIV and AIDS. AFEW has built a track record for projects on TB, viral hepatitis and sexual and reproductive health and rights as well. AFEW strives to social inclusion of the key populations at risk and a healthy future of Eastern Europe and Central Asia!”

AFEW is dedicated to improving the health of key populations in society. With a focus on Eastern Europe and Central Asia, AFEW strives to promote health and increase access to prevention, treatment and care for major public health concerns such as HIV, TB, viral hepatitis, and sexual and reproductive health.

AFEW International is an uniquely positioned organisation as one of the few HIV, TB, hepatitis and sexual and reproductive health and rights organisations working in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. This is a region where the work is critical, as HIV and sexually transmitted infections are on the rise, sexuality education is deficient and gender-based violence goes largely unrecognized. Further, cases of multidrug resistant and extensive drug resistant tuberculosis are increasing; and there is a very high prevalence of hepatitis C. The group with the highest risk for HIV and HIV related diseases are people who use drugs. However, transmission through sexual contact is increasing and the prevalence among women and men who have sex with men is increasing.

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Reasons for Drug Policy Reform

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Text: Michel Kazatchkine, UN secretary general special envoy on HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Why is eastern Europe the only region in the world that still has a growing HIV epidemic? In one of the region’s countries, Russia, more than two thirds of all HIV infections, and 55% of the near 100 000 new infections reported last year, resulted from drug injection.

Some 3.2 million people in eastern Europe inject drugs, and about 1.5 million of them are in Russia. In 2007 the number of newly reported HIV cases among Russian people who inject drugs (12 538) was similar to the number in the rest of eastern Europe (12 026). But since then the numbers have diverged hugely.

Scaling up of harm reduction programmes in several countries coincided with a stabilising of HIV rates—and fewer than 7000 new cases outside Russia in 2014. In Russia, however, where access to sterile needles and syringes is low and opioid substitutes remain illegal and unavailable, the number of people who inject drugs newly infected with HIV climbed to nearly 22 500 in 2014.

Criminalisation of drug use

The reasons for Russia’s high figures include the prohibition and effective criminalisation of drug use, repressive law enforcement, and stigma around drug use. These factors lead people to inject in unsafe conditions for fear of police and arrests and result in needle sharing and overdose.

In 2015, the United Nations’ secretary general, Ban Ki-Moon, called for “careful rebalancing of the international policy on controlled drugs.”

“We must consider alternatives to criminalisation and incarceration of people who use drugs,” he said. “We should increase the focus on public health, prevention, treatment, and care.”

The World Health Organization, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and UNAIDS jointly recommend a package of harm reduction interventions as best practice to reduce the risk of acquiring, and improve treatment of, HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis among people who inject drugs. Such strategies, which do not require prohibition of harmful behaviours, are key to reducing death and disease because drug dependency is characterised by people’s inability to abstain.

Continue reading here.

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Ikram Ibragimov: “AFEW-Tajikistan is the Only NGO with HIV Rapid Testing Services in the Country”

Фото ИкромThe activities of AIDS Foundation East-West Tajikistan for already 15 years are directed into improving the health of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection. Last December HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point was opened in in the representative office of RPO AFEW-Tajikistan in the city of Qurghonteppa. Director of AFEW-Tajikistan Ikram Ibragimov tells about the achievements of the testing point and the organisation in general.

– How was the year of 2016 for AFEW-Tajikistan? What new and important things happened?

– The year was full with events. We changed the statute of the organisation, and we made the areas and directions of its activities wider. We also developed and approved the strategy of the development of the organisation for the medium term, strengthened the partnership and cooperation with governmental and non-governmental organizations in the health sector. We have our own new premises for our office. We renovated it, and have been working there for three months already. In November of the last year we elected the management of the organisation – the board, the audit committee and the director – for the years of 2017-2021. Generally speaking, I would say that 2016 was successful for us.

– Just recently you opened HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point in Qurghonteppa. Why did you choose this city to be the “base” for it?

– Our second office is situated in Qurghonteppa. That is why we decided to open HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point on the premises where key groups of population are already provided with the direct services. By the way, now we are the only NGO in the country that has such service. Besides, one of the main routes of Afghan drug traffic goes through Khatlon region and that is why drug addiction level in the region is high. People who use drugs are the main target audience for us. As a rule, donors and partners work in the capital and on the North of the country. We decided to go South.

HTC center 3– What are the first results of HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point?

– Starting from December, 1 and up until December, 31 there were 18 people tested for HIV: 9 men and 9 women. Thanks God, there were no new cases of HIV found. People find out about our testing point from our website, media, business-cards that we disseminate, information from the clients who visit the centre themselves. Mostly, our visitors are representatives of key populations.

– At the end of 2016 you developed a draft of multilateral agreement on cooperation in the field of prevention of socially significant diseases in Khatlon region and the provision of medical, social and legal services for vulnerable groups. What does it mean?

– This agreement means the cooperation with different organisations that provide complex services (medical-psychological, social, legal and others) to key populations on many levels. The agreement is created on the existing epidemical situation with taking into consideration the socially significant diseases in Khatlon region in Tajikistan. It is planned that 46 government and non-government organisations of the region will become the members of the agreement. We strive to create favourable conditions for the clients of our social support services, so that they can get high-quality, timely and free services of certain specialists. The service should be affordable. Therefore, this memorandum is intended to lower the difficulty of access to services for key populations, and to create a basis for the integration of various services “under one roof.” This is so-called principle of “the single window.”

– What are AFEW-Tajikistan’s plans for 2017?

– As I mentioned before, last year we agreed upon the strategy of the organisational development for 2017-2019. Therefore, all our plans are directed into reaching the quality indicators of this strategy.

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Nearly two-thirds of European HIV cases are now in Russia

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Source: ria.ru

The annual number of new cases of HIV increased by at least 8% in 2015 in the whole of the World Health Organization (WHO) European region, and by 60% in the last decade, according to last month’s annual surveillance report by the European Centre for Disease Control (ECDC) and WHO Europe.

A continued increase in new diagnoses in Russia was responsible for most of the increase. The previous year, as aidsmap.com reported, 60% of European-region new cases were in Russia. In 2015 this increased to 64% of all cases.

The 98,177 diagnoses recorded last year in Russia equate to one HIV diagnosis for every 1493 Russians each year. In comparison, the 55,230 diagnoses recorded in the rest of the WHO region represent one diagnosis for every 13,157 people – one-ninth as many per head.

The number of new HIV diagnoses in Russia has increased 15% in one year, 57% since 2010, and 133% since 2006. Russia admitted this year that more than a million of its citizens have HIV. This is 0.8% of its adult population and is at least the same number as the US in a country with 45% of the US population. At the current rate of increase, this prevalence will double to 1.6% in the next 12 years.

Excluding Russia, 46% of infections in the WHO Europe region were ascribed to heterosexual sex, 26% to sex between men, and 13% to injecting drug use – and less than 1% to mother-to-child transmission. In the last ten years, infections in men who have sex with men (MSM) have increased by 38% and in heterosexuals by 19%, but have fallen in injecting drug users by 38%. In Russia, heterosexual sex is the cause ascribed to half of all recorded cases and a third to injecting drug use.

WESTERN, CENTRAL AND EASTERN EUROPE

In western Europe (which also includes Israel and Greece for WHO’s purposes), and in the European Union (plus Norway, Switzerland and Iceland), the number of new cases of HIV have remained almost static. In western Europe about 30,000 new cases have been reported each year from 2010 to 2014 and in the EU 32,500. An apparent slight decline in 2015 (10% in western Europe and 8% in the EU/EEA) may be due mainly to delays in 2015 reports arriving.

Central Europe – which includes the former communist countries running from Poland down to the Balkans, and also Cyprus and Turkey – remains a low-prevalence area for HIV, but saw a 78% increase in infections from 2010. However, there are signs that a feared acceleration of HIV in these countries may have slowed, with only a 4% increase registered between 2014 and 2015, though this does conceal larger increases in infections in gay men in some countries, including Bulgaria and the Czech Republic. However, many of these countries still have the lowest rate of new infections in Europe, with Macedonia (one infection per 83,000 people last year) and Slovakia (one per 62,500) reporting the lowest rates.

In eastern Europe, which comprises all the former Soviet states (including Lithuania, Latvia and Estonia, which are in the EU) if Russia is excluded, the annual number of new diagnoses has stayed flat or fallen slightly (by 9%) since 2010, though the percentage due to heterosexual sex has more than doubled to 65% of the total and the proportion due to injecting drug use has fallen to 26% of the total. The slight overall fall in eastern Europe conceals big increases in some countries with relatively low HIV prevalence, including Georgia with a 48% increase since 2010, Cyprus with a 95% increase, and Belarus with a 116% increase.

INFECTIONS IN MEN WHO HAVE SEX WITH MEN

In western and central Europe the epidemic is increasingly concentrating in men who have sex with men. In the last ten years, the proportion of infections due to heterosexual sex in western Europe has fallen by 41% and to injecting drugs by 48%, while the proportion due to sex between men has increased by 7%.

The proportion ascribed to sex between men in eastern Europe is still only 4% – but this in fact represents a tenfold increase. In some states such as Belarus and Estonia, infections in MSM were regarded as scarcely existing ten years ago – which means that the 58 cases recorded in Belarus and the 18 in Estonia last year represent proportionally big increases. In Russia sex between men still officially only accounts for a tiny proportion of new HIV cases – 1.5%. However, WHO does not regard Russian data as “consistent” and excludes it from some of its analyses.

The increases in infections in gay men seem to be starting to occur in some countries further east than previously. Georgia, for instance, saw a nearly 50% increase in the annual HIV diagnosis total from 2010 to 2015, a 12-fold increase in gay men, and a threefold increase in MSM from 2014. Belarus saw a 166% increase in HIV cases and a fourfold increase in gay men. Ukraine reports similar increases in gay men against a background of falling diagnoses in other groups. Increases in MSM infections were also reported from the central Asian countries of Kazakhstan and Kyrgyzstan. These increases are from a very low base, though, and may just represent that more men testing HIV-positive are prepared to admit they caught HIV from other men.

OTHER CHANGES IN INDIVIDUAL COUNTRIES

One country that has seen big relative increases in HIV is Turkey. The 2956 cases reported last year represent a 5.5-fold increase over diagnoses in 2010 and a 62% increase in one year. Because Turkey is a populous country (75 million), this still represents a low rate of infection (one per 37,000 head of population per year, less than a third of the UK’s rate), but Turkey may be a country whose HIV epidemic is worth watching.

In the EU, Latvia and Estonia had the highest rates. While Estonia’s formely explosive needle-driven epidemic continues to shrink, new HIV cases have increased by 43% since 2010 in Latvia. Notably, Latvia has been till very recently the only WHO Europe country whose national HIV treatment guidelines still recommended treatment should not start till CD4 counts had fallen below 200 cells/mm3.

Western European countries that saw increases in recent years include Malta, where the new HIV diagnosis figures leaped by more than 50% last year and have risen more than fourfold since 2010, though the absolute number of people with HIV in this small island country is still low, at about 300 people in total.

Another country that has seen significant increases since 2010 is Ireland, with a 47% increase relative to 2010 and a 43% increase from 2014 to 2015 – again, mostly in gay men.

The UK still reported by far the largest number of new cases of HIV of any country in western Europe to ECDC – 6078 reported to ECDC last year, way ahead of France, with the second highest number at 3943. However, the annual diagnosis figure has fallen since 2005, as we reported last September, including for the first time a tiny (1%) decrease in diagnoses in gay men. The diagnosis rate per head of population, one per 10,638 people, was second only to Luxembourg’s in western Europe in 2014, but in 2015 was overtaken by Portugal, Ireland and Malta.

One needs to be cautious about saying HIV cases have fallen in specific countries because there is such variation in the number of delayed reports sent to ECDC. However, since 2010 there have been significant falls in HIV diagnoses, exceeding the falls seen in the UK, in France, Spain and Italy.

In France there appears to have been a significant drop of 30% in diagnoses notified between 2014 and 2015, and a 40% drop in gay men. Fewer than 1000 HIV cases were reported in French gay men last year, a third as many as in the UK. In contrast reported diagnoses have risen by 36% in Germany since 2010 (33% in gay men) and this country reported nearly as many new HIV cases as France last year.

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Source: UNAIDS

MIGRANTS, LATE DIAGNOSES, AND AIDS

Over a quarter (27%) of new diagnoses in the WHO Europe region were in people not born in the country where they were diagnosed. While two-thirds of this 27% represent people from outside Europe, primarily high-prevalence countries, infections in migrants from outside Europe fell by 29% in the last ten years while infections in intra-European migrants increased by 59%.

Nearly half of all new diagnoses (48%) were in people with CD4 counts below 350 cells/mm3. The proportion of these late diagnoses was 55% in heterosexuals and 37% in gay men. It was also 64% in those over 50 years old. Over a quarter (28%) were diagnosed with CD4 counts below 200 cells/mm3, and 12% had an AIDS-related condition at diagnosis.

Regarding diagnoses of AIDS (in both newly-diagnosed people and the already diagnosed), there were 14,579 reported in the WHO European region last year. Diagnosis of any AIDS-related condition was extremely rare in central and western Europe – only one person per half a million head of population in central Europe, and one person per quarter million in western Europe. In contrast one person per 10,000 head of population had an AIDS diagnosis in eastern Europe, including Russia. This means that AIDS diagnoses in eastern Europe were more common than HIV diagnoses in all western European countries bar Ireland, Luxembourg and Malta.

INTERPRETING THE FIGURES

ECDC’s figures always need to be interpreted with caution. Russia, with its huge preponderance of HIV cases, reports a much more limited and more irregular set of figures to ECDC than most other countries. The efficiency of HIV surveillance and the proportion of late reports vary widely from one country to another.

The proportion of people diagnosed also varies widely. If testing rates increase in a country, then it may look as if new infections are increasing when they are not. Some countries, including large western European ones like the UK and Germany, do not collect centralised, verifiable figures for HIV tests. In those that do, testing rates vary hugely. In Kosovo, for instance, just three HIV cases were reported last year – but that is probably because only 1312 tests were conducted, representing 0.07% of the population. In contrast, Russia performed over 28 million tests – meaning it tested more than 20% of its adult population. Generally, HIV testing rates are higher in eastern Europe than they are in central and western Europe. This tends to mean that higher testing rates compensate for lower reporting rates.

It is in central European countries like Poland (0.62% of the adult population tested) and Serbia (0.71%) that low rates of testing imply low rates of diagnosis – meaning that there may be considerably more people with HIV in these countries than appears to be the case.

REFERENCE

The 2015 ECDC/WHO Europe HIV/AIDS Surveillance Report can be downloaded here.

Source: www.aidsmap.com

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Improving Outcomes for People Living with HIV

2136950249_b3e5f6a6fa_bThis is a call to action for European governments, international organisations, patient organisations, and the wider health community to align on a new HIV policy agenda that addresses the crucial unmet needs of people living with HIV (PLHIV) – to ensure they can live longer in good health, and participate fully in society and the economy.

Current HIV policy frameworks rightly focus on prevention, diagnosis and effective treatment (viral suppression), but do not go beyond this to address other health and social challenges faced by PLHIV. In Europe, where viral suppression should increasingly be the norm, it is vital that policy makers and healthcare providers recognize these challenges and respond.

An integrated approach is needed to improve:

  • Health outcomes – by addressing the increased risk that PLHIV will develop other medical problems (co-morbidities) – including mental health issues.
  • Social outcomes – in particular by combating stigma and discrimination, and ensuring that PLHIV are able to secure and retain employment and housing.

Effective action to improve outcomes, and reduce the health burden and costs associated with HIV, can bring meaningful economic benefits and reduce demands on European healthcare systems.

We call on the EU and Member States to:

1. Revisit the Dublin Declaration on Partnership to Fight HIV/AIDS, and ensure that its monitoring adopts a ‘life-long’ approach to the health and social inclusion of PLHIV.

2. Identify and agree on policy indicators necessary to monitor and assess country performance in improving health and social outcomes for PLHIV.

3. Adopt in 2017 an integrated EU Policy Framework on HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis and TB – thereby extending the focus of the EU Action Plan on HIV/AIDS, which comes to an end in 2016.

Background

Whilst important progress has been made in the global response to HIV/AIDS, with the European Union (EU) playing an instrumental role, the European region – and in particular Eastern Europe – now has the fastest growing HIV epidemic globally. 29,992 people were diagnosed with HIV in the EU/EEA in 2014. At the same time, PLHIV are living longer, which has created new challenges relating to the prevention, treatment, and management of co-morbidities.

With the EU Action Plan on HIV/AIDS expiring at the end of 2016, and the Dublin Declaration on Partnership to fight HIV/AIDS now more than a decade old, European governments and the EU institutions have an opportunity to make progress on their political commitment to fighting both the transmission of HIV, as well as its health and social impacts – including the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

Continuing challenges include the strengthening of prevention programmes, reducing late diagnoses, ensuring equity and universality of access, and the social consequences of HIV that stem from stigma and discrimination. Governments and health systems must respond to the fact that PLHIV are living longer. We must ensure that PLHIV remain in good health as they grow older, and can lead successful, productive and rewarding lives. This aspiration should motivate the HIV response in all European countries – not only those that already perform well in relation to the UNAIDS targets for diagnosis, treatment and viral suppression.

The Beyond Viral Suppression Initiative

The Beyond Viral Suppression initiative arises out of a shared recognition among leading HIV experts that there are crucially important issues relating to the health and social inclusion of PLHIV that have to date received insufficient attention from policy makers and healthcare providers, and which must now form part of our HIV response.

In an era when ageing populations and health system sustainability are central challenges for all European countries, the initiative will also aim to inform debates about cost-effective strategies for co-morbidity prevention and management, whilst ensuring patient-centered healthcare delivery. Our recommendations should therefore be of high relevance both to policy makers and the wider health community.

The steering group is co-chaired by: Nikos Dedes, the Founder of Positive Voice (the Greek association for PLHIV) and a Board member of the European AIDS Treatment Group (EATG); Professor Jane Anderson of Homerton University Hospital NHS Foundation Trust in London; and Professor Jeffrey Lazarus of ISGlobal, Hospital Clínic at the University of Barcelona, and CHIP, Rigshospitalet, University of Copenhagen. The initiative is enabled by sponsorship provided by Gilead Sciences and ViiV Healthcare.

The initiative is developing a performance assessment of HIV services ‘beyond viral suppression’ – focusing on: access to appropriate health services; health outcomes – co-morbidity and co-infection prevention, and health-related quality of life; and social outcomes.

A research team supported by a study group of leading academics will seek to identify the policy indicators necessary to assess countries’ performance at improving health and social outcomes ‘beyond viral suppression’. Our aim is thereby to complement the work of other initiatives focusing on HIV prevention, diagnosis, and access to high quality treatment and care.

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People with HIV are Living Longer but Still Face Many Challenges

2073016443_fc28f379e1Brussels, 7 December 2016: The substantial increase in life expectancy for people living with HIV (PLHIV) is a hugely important achievement. However, PLHIV continue to face significant health related challenges which are in urgent need of attention from policy makers and the wider health community. A new initiative, ‘HIV Outcomes: Beyond Viral Suppression’, today launched a campaign to highlight and address these challenges, which include co-existing physical and mental health conditions (that PLHIV are at higher risk of developing), and social inclusion – which continues to be undermined by stigma and discrimination.

The initiative, which features high profile patient representatives, clinicians, academics, and industry, wants health systems and HIV policy frameworks to take account of these diverse challenges, so that PLHIV gain access to the necessary health and support services in order to live long and well.

‘HIV Outcomes: Beyond Viral Suppression’ seeks to complement other HIV initiatives focusing on prevention, diagnosis and access to effective care, where there are global targets for the HIV response but much work remains to be done. The initiative also builds upon the WHO Global Health Sector Strategy on HIV, 2016-2021, which highlights the need for PLHIV to have access to chronic care, but does not provide specific objectives or targets in that area.

Speaking ahead of the launch event in Brussels today, Nikos Dedes, Co-Chair of the HIV Outcomes: Beyond Viral Suppression Steering Group, said: “Current HIV policy was not conceived with ageing in mind, but living long term with HIV creates its own specific needs. The policy environment must adapt to recognise, measure and address these needs.”

Professor Jeffrey Lazarus of ISGlobal, Hospital Clínic at the University of Barcelona, is leading a study group composed of HIV and health system experts in order to assess the performance of health systems in addressing the challenges highlighted in this initiative. Lazarus presented an interim report at today’s launch event.

The campaign comes at a watershed moment for HIV/AIDS policy with the EU’s Action Plan set to expire at the end of this year. The Initiative seeks to encourage the European Commission to adopt a new integrated framework on HIV, viral hepatitis and tuberculosis that can provide a coordinated response to these threats. The Steering Group also wants to see the European monitoring framework on HIV (based on the 2004 Dublin Declaration) expanded to reflect new and ongoing health and social needs of PLHIV.

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Today We Celebrate 15 Years of AFEW!

15yearsafew_logo_proposal2Dear AFEW supporters and partners!

Today is a very important day for AFEW International. We are honouring World AIDS Day 2016, and also celebrating the 15th anniversary of our organisation. We are very grateful that we have spent these wonderful 15 years with your support and appreciation, and we would like to thank you for this!

We know that 15 years of our work would be not possible without you. We understand that together with you we are working towards a healthy future of our region. We realize the potential and current issues of Eastern Europe and Central Asia, and we are confident that we will be able to overcome them together with you. Thank you for being with us throughout our successes and challenges!

Having a leading position with expertise in HIV, TB and other related public health concerns in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia, AFEW will continue fighting stigma and discrimination, upholding the human rights, and improving the access to and quality of health services for key populations at risk for HIV, TB and viral hepatitis. This is still so much needed as the region where we work is still experiencing HIV growth, faces increased incidence of MDR-TB and has a high prevalence of Hepatitis C. Our activities help to change the future of the region and contribute to a healthy and comfortable life of people!

Thank you for being with us!

Happy World AIDS day and happy AFEW anniversary!

Sincerely,

AFEW International

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Community-Based Participatory Research: Call for Proposals

img_0902AFEW International in partnership with Flowz and in consultation with the Global Network of People living with HIV and the Eurasian Harm Reduction Network is managing a small grants fund to support community-based participatory research (CBPR) projects in Eastern Europe and Central-Asia (EECA) region. The purpose of the community based participatory research small grants fund is to:

  • Increase CBPR research capacity in the EECA region,
  • Increase the body of CBPR research in the EECA region,
  • Support increased visibility and presence of CBPR from EECA at the International AIDS Conference 2018, which will be held in Amsterdam, The Netherlands. Note: The selected CBO’s for the small grants fund are expected to submit an abstract for AIDS2018.

The small grants fund is part of a wider programme to build the research capacity of community based organisations in EECA region and increase meaningful participation of the region at the AIDS2018.  The Dutch Ministry of Foreign Affairs gives financial support to the programme.

As a first step, a CBPR training took place in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan in November 2016. 24 participants representing key populations and people living with HIV CBO’s from 11 countries across the EECA region attended this training. These 24 participants were selected from an applicants’ pool of more than 200 applicants.

Criteria for participant selection for the training were among others:

  • Based in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine or Uzbekistan,
  • Community based organisation and working with one or more of the following key populations: drug users, LGBTI, sex workers, or with people living with HIV,
  • A representative regional spread.

Following the training, participants will be able to access online training modules to further shape their research skills. These modules are also accessible for the training applicants who could not be accommodated for the training.

Overview of all CBPR project activities (2016 – 2018)

  • Call for proposals for small research grants (Dec 2016)
  • Selection research projects (Jan 2017)
  • Grants administration and dissemination (Feb 2017)
  • Research projects (Feb 2017 – Fall 2017)
  • Online modules for certification (Nov 2016 – April 2017).
  • Webinar on Data Analysis (late Spring/Summer 2017)
  • Workshop on Dissemination and Abstract Writing for up to 25 participants (Fall 2017)
  • Workshop on Presenting research findings for up to 25 participants (Spring 2018)
  • International AIDS Conference 2018, Amsterdam, the Netherlands (July 2018)

Call for proposals small grants fund

It is expected that grants awarded will be between € 5.000 and €10.000 (maximum).

Applications are strongly encouraged from the 24 training participants and requested only from the training applicants pool, no wider circulation.

Applications will need to be received by January 16th 2017.

Applicants will be informed on the outcomes of their application by the end of January 2017 or early February 2017.

Eligibility criteria for the call for proposals for community based participatory research

An applicant should:

  • Be a participant of the CBPR training held in November 2016, or training applicants, who could not be accommodated for the training
  • Be an organisation based in Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Moldova, Russia, Tajikistan, Turkmenistan, Ukraine or Uzbekistan,
  • Be a community based organisation (CBO),
  • Be working with one or more of the following key populations: drug users, LGBTI, sex workers, or with people living with HIV,
  • Ensure that their application is able to demonstrate the meaningful and active participation of the community in the research, i.e. that it is truly community based and participatory,
  • Ensure that their research topic relates to HIV/AIDS (includes sexual health, TB, viral hepatitis, psychosocial aspects, treatment adherence, etc.),
  • Ensure that their application is focussed on explanatory, causal or intervention research. Meta analysis or policy analysis are NOT the purpose of this small grants fund.

The applications to the Small Grant CBPR proposals should be submitted online and in Russian or in English. If you are eligible for the call, please click here to start application.

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AFEW Director is the Chair of TB/HIV Working Group

ankeAFEW executive director Anke van Dam became the chair of Wolfheze Working Group on TB/HIV collaborative activities. The group will document and promote the best models and identify research priorities of integrated TB/HIV care in the European region. Members of the group will also identify barriers in TB/HIV services and collaboration.

“I am very honoured to be part of the group,” – Anke says. – “AFEW is implementing integrated HIV/TB activities in the EECA region for quite some years now. I will bring this experience into the group, and hope to contribute to collecting best models. There is still so much to gain in improving the care and health of people living with both HIV and TB.”

Wolfheze TB/HIV Working Group started a year ago in The Hague, The Netherlands. There, Wolfheze and WHO National TB Programme Managers’ meeting participants discussed the need for strengthening TB/HIV collaborative activities in the context of the WHO End TB Strategy. They agreed to create a Working Group on TB/HIV collaborative activities taking into account specific challenges and opportunities in the WHO European region.

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Irina Used Drugs and Became a Social Worker

irinaIrina Starkova started to use drugs in 1980’s in Osh city in Kyrgyzstan. She tried all the drugs that were available at that time starting with opium, ephedrine and finishing with heroin. She began to use drugs with her husband who was just released from prison.

In 1983, Irina gave birth to a son. “I was happy, but even that did not stop me from drug usage. I couldn’t imagine life without drugs, – Iryna says. – In 1990, I was imprisoned for the first time. After that, I was imprisoned for three times more. In total, I was in detention for almost 11 years, and it was all for the drug use.”

Thus, her son grew up mostly without his mother. Irina’s parents were raising him up. In 2000, she was visited by a specialist from the AIDS Center. He took her blood for HIV testing, and a week later Irina got to know that she was HIV positive. At that time, she had very little information about her diagnosis. “I didn’t know how to live and was afraid of people and relatives condemn, – she remembers. – But I began to shoot up even more drugs. I thought that I will die soon because of HIV…”

Nine years ago, when she was released from prison for the last time, her mom and son got to know that Irina was HIV positive. Their reaction was very unpleasant: Irina’s son said that he did not need a mother, and that she was his shame, and her mother was afraid to live with her in the same apartment. Therefore, Irina was forced to leave to Bishkek, the capital of Kyrgyzstan.

In Bishkek she also found heroin, and it all lasted until she went to rehabilitation in NGO “Ranar” where she got helped. “I don’t use drugs for 9 years already, – she says. – In 2009, I was tested for HIV one more time and I found out that I am healthy and I have no positive status. They explained me that this was an erroneous result. I did not know whether to laugh or cry, because all these years were a nightmare for me. What would have my life been if I knew that I was not sick…”

When Irina went back to Osh, she visited women center “Podruga” (“Girlfriend” in Russian) to receive their services. “Podruga” was established to combat HIV, AIDS and STIs in the Kyrgyz Republic among vulnerable groups. The organization is also is active in HIV/AIDS advocacy and human rights. Now, for three years already, Irina is working in the organization as a social worker. She helps women who use drugs.