AFEW Presents Important Assessments about EECA

AFEW International, together with its network members from Eastern Europe and Central Asia (EECA) is getting ready for AFEW’s Regional autumn school to be held in Almaty, Kazakhstan from October 30 till November 3, 2017. The autumn school will provide the platform for learning, exchange, strategizing and planning for community members and NGO partners from 10 different countries. The regional autumn school is an annual event that takes place as a part of ‘Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations’ regional approach of AFEW.

One of the highlights of the autumn school’s program will be the presentation of three important assessments that AFEW International recently finalized as a part of the ‘Bridging the Gaps’ program. The final results of all assessments will be available to the general public around December of 2017.

Harm reduction friendly rehabilitation

The assessment on harm reduction friendly rehabilitation in EECA is the study that describes the state of rehabilitation services in Ukraine, Russia, Georgia and Kyrgyzstan. It presents seven international approaches for rehabilitation programs and its activities. The participants of AFEW’s autumn school will discuss the recommendations of what approach is better to adopt for developing stronger work capacity.

Migrant people who use drugs

The assessment on migrant people who use drugs (PUD) is coming from the questionnaire that was disseminated in the EECA region. A survey amongst 600 people who use drugs in Tajikistan and Kyrgyzstan showed that 43% of the respondents have experienced periods of migration to another country in the EECA region, mostly to Russia. From the qualitative interviews with migrant PUD in Russia and Kazakhstan, it is possible to assume that people have very little access to health facilities, legal documents and often little options to return to their native country. The participants of the autumn school will discuss the full assessment and come up with interventions for the coming two years to build good practices and to advocate for the rights and lives of the community members.

Shrinking space for the civil society

The assessment on shrinking space for civil society is the in-depth assessment on the space for the civil society organizations with a special focus on harm reduction and drug policy in NGO’s and community networks. The withdrawing of international funding and shrinking space for the civil society form a real threat for the fight against the further spread of HIV in the region and the rights and lives of communities. During the autumn school, the coping mechanisms will be discussed and further steps will be designed to address the conclusions.

NGO-Based HIV Testing Available in Kazakhstan

President of Central Asian Association of People Living with HIV and the ‘Kazakhstan Union of People Living with HIV’ Nurali Amanzholov

Author: Marina Maksimova, Kazakhstan

From early 2018, HIV rapid testing in Kazakhstan will be available based in the non-governmental organizations (NGOs). With the President of Central Asian Association of People Living with HIV and the ‘Kazakhstan Union of People Living with HIV’ Nurali Amanzholov we are talking about advantages, mechanisms and preparatory work associated with this innovative step in fighting HIV.

– Nurali, it is well known that in Kazakhstan HIV screening test can be conducted at any regional AIDS Center. What is the reason for organizing rapid testing on NGOs’ premises?
– Nowadays, only AIDS Centers are authorized to conduct HIV testing in Kazakhstan. Every regional center has such a department. The problem is that representatives of the key populations (people, who use drugs, sex workers, men who have sex with men) prefer to avoid them. NGOs, using peer-to-peer approach, have better access to these groups, and in such a way there is more confidence. Non-governmental organizations can significantly increase the coverage of those tested for HIV, which means that the control over the epidemic will also increase. Another advantage of the proposed innovation is that it allows to identify HIV infection at an early stage, ensure timely treatment, preserve health and employability, and prevent new cases.

– What are exactly NGOs doing to introduce such service?

– Last year, with the support of the Corporate Foundation Eurasia Foundation of Central Asia, which is supported by the United States Agency for International Development (USAID), Kazakhstan Union of People Living with HIV implemented the project ‘Access to the NGO-based rapid HIV testing in Kazakhstan.’ Its goal is to create an enabling legal environment for providing HIV rapid testing services by NGOs to improve access to this service for key populations. Within the framework of the project, we analyzed the barriers during the introduction of the NGO-based rapid testing. Now we are working on the methodological recommendations and draft of the decree, which should make this initiative legal. It will contain clear operational rules of this system as well as all requirements and methods of control.

– Nurali, what kind of preparatory work is carried out to introduce this NGO-based services next year?

– Today specialists from the Republican Center for AIDS Prevention and Control together with their colleagues from Kazakhstan Union of People Living with HIV provide trainings for NGOs on how to conduct rapid testing in two pilot regions – East Kazakhstan and Pavlodar. We have already conducted trainings for the representatives of four non-governmental organizations. Specialists have taught our staff how to do an HIV rapid testing, and how to conduct pre-test and post-test counseling. They provided information about the quality control of the procedure, safety measures, recycling of consumables, talked about the observance of professional ethics. Each participant knows that if the test results are positive, the patient should be redirected to the AIDS Center for further laboratory diagnosis and confirmation of the HIV status.

Was your initiative supported by the governmental structures?

– Representatives of the Ministry of Health of the Republic of Kazakhstan, the Republican Center for AIDS Prevention and Control, leading international organizations dealing with HIV in the country are actively involved in this process. There is a good chance to include NGO-based rapid HIV testing into the national testing algorithm, which is being currently reviewed by the Ministry of Health. This will make fundraising efforts of NGOs more efficient, including attracting public funding for these services. This approach insures stability of the services, and of NGOs in general. I am sure that the topic of HIV rapid testing on NGOs’ premises deserves a separate discussion at the 22nd International AIDS Conference AIDS2018 in Amsterdam, and we are ready to share our experience there.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Central Asian NGOs Built a Network for Cross-Border Control of Tuberculosis

Author: Marina Maximova, Kazakhstan

During the regional seminar-meeting held on 6-7 June in Almaty, Central Asian nongovernmental organizations established a network of partner organizations to address issues of labour migration and tuberculosis. The participants accepted draft Memorandum of cooperation between non-profit organizations to reduce the prevalence and incidence of tuberculosis among migrant workers in the countries of the region.

“This document was created in response to the need of NGOs consolidation to educate migrant workers about TB symptoms and the opportunities of free treatment and diagnostics in the framework of the project, to promote treatment compliance, to exchange information and to disseminate best practices in the countries of Central Asian region,” says a project manager of the Global Fund, a representative of Project HOPE in the Republic of Kazakhstan Bakhtiyar Babamuratov.

The event was organized by the Project HOPE in the framework of the grant from Global Fund to fight AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Representatives of non-governmental organizations from Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan, Tajikistan and Uzbekistan attended the seminar .

Migrants do not want to be treated

From all the countries in the Central Asian region, Kazakhstan is accommodating the main stream of migrant workers from neighbouring countries. Migration flow continues to grow. Those who come to find a job often agree to any work, they often live in poor housing conditions and do not eat well. This results in tuberculosis development. In 2016, 753 external migrants addressed the organizations of primary health care and TB facilities of Kazakhstan and were tested for tuberculosis. In 2015, there were only 157 visits. Most migrant workers prefer not to attend medical institutions and refuse to be treated in the TB clinics or to be examined by a doctor. They consider it to be a wasting of working time, i.e. money. They have to support families left at home, therefore money is the main reason to come to a foreign country. For the same reason people do not want to spend money on health, even though a Comprehensive plan to combat tuberculosis in Kazakhstan for 2014-2020 involves activities to improve TB services for migrant workers.

Particularly alarming are the cases when a migrant worker is diagnosed with HIV/TB co-infection, and when such patient needs a serious treatment and social support. This important topic will be discussed in 2018 in the framework of the 22nd international AIDS conference – AIDS 2018 – in Amsterdam. This conference will be very special as for AFEW International and the whole region where the organization works — Eastern Europe and Central Asia.

Work at construction sites and markets

In the situation mentioned above, the participation of the NGOs in addressing of this issue has become very important. Outreach workers and volunteers – people, whom the target group trusts, – are searching for migrant workers on construction sites, at the farms, markets, in the restaurants or cafes. They tell migrants about the disease and the free treatment, convince to pass the examination and to provide social support. The results of such work are impressive.

“Within the project, implemented by Project HOPE in 2016, staff and volunteers of our public Fund helped 898 migrant workers to be tested for tuberculosis. For 25 of them the diagnosis was confirmed, and with our assistance people were able to receive free treatment. Besides, we provided migrant workers with motivational food packages. 8,312 labour migrants received information about the symptoms of tuberculosis, and now they know where to go if they are sick,” says the Director of the Public Fund Taldykorgan regional Foundation of employment promotion Svetlana Saduakasova.

These are the results of the activity of only one non-governmental organization in Kazakhstan. Nowadays, social activists are effectively working in eight regions of the country. Such results are possible to achieve only thanks to active collaboration with the non-governmental organizations from those countries where work migrants come from. The community members actively communicate with each other and exchange useful information to be aware of whether the diagnosed person came back to his home city, got registered in the TB clinic, continued to receive treatment, and so on. Only under these conditions we can achieve a complete recovery from TB for each individual and finally stop the growth of morbidity in the region.

AFEW Kazakhstan Helps People Getting out of the Shadows

29,568 HIV cases were registered in Kazakhstan as of February 2017. According to the official data, in 2016 there were14,345 tuberculosis patients registered in the country. Usually, these people hide themselves, and are often afraid even to tell their relatives about their diagnosis. But there are also those who openly talk about their status, and who show that it is possible to get out of the shadow.

At the end of March, the photo exhibition ‘Life in the Shadow’ dedicated to the World Tuberculosis Day took place in Almaty. AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan organized this event. The exhibition featured photos of people affected by HIV and tuberculosis. Today we will tell the stories of some of them.

LEARN TO LOVE YOURSELF

After the death of her mother in 2008, Venera started to lose weight. The woman thought it was because of the grief she was experiencing, but still went to the hospital for the X-rays and medical tests. There it was discovered that Venera had an open form of tuberculosis.

Venera realized that it does not matter what your position in the society is, the tuberculosis makes everyone equal

“By that time, I was very weak and all the time felt sick in my stomach. I weighed 48 kilograms,” says Venera. “During three months I was out there with an open form of tuberculosis until they accepted me in the hospital. All I wanted at that time was to lie down and die! I was in darkness, alone, rejected by everyone. I did not believe that I would get out of that hospital alive. All the time I was sick because of the pills. My son and my sister, who, after my mother’s death, was taken to an orphanage, as I did not have time to register custody, were the only people who kept me alive. They called me, told me they needed me, asked not to die. It was the strongest motivation to live! After some time, I started to feel better and began recovering.”

A year later, Venera was diagnosed with tuberculosis and lung disintegration. At that time, the woman was pregnant. Since no one told her that during the pregnancy tuberculosis can be treated, Venera was advised to have an abortion.

“In the hospital they gave me the bed that was standing in the hallway, and soon the whole department knew I had tuberculosis,” Venera recalls. “People were scared of me. The gynaecologist was commenting something like, why people like me are even allowed to give births at all. That was such a humiliation!”

After she got out of the hospital, Venera realized that it does not matter what your position in the society is, the tuberculosis makes everyone equal. The woman became stronger and kinder, started to pay more attention to her relatives, helped those who needed help. Three years later, Venera gave birth to the healthy twins.

“I defeated tuberculosis. If you have such diagnosis, do not be not afraid and believe that you will recover!” says Venera. “Do not be scared of anyone, this is not a disgrace. Most importantly – do not refuse the treatment, otherwise you can infect your relatives and friends. Learn to love yourself!”

A DECISION TO LIVE

To those who only got to know about their diagnosis, Salavat advises to be strong and take care about their health

Salavat has been living with HIV since 2011. The man has heard something about this disease, but did not have a clear understanding of it. He thought it was somewhere far away, not here, and he could not even imagine that he could get infected.

“The doctor was calming me down, saying that people live with it, that it is not fatal, that in the future there probably will be a medicine… At first, of course, I felt bad, but I quickly overcame my fears,” Salavat says. “I made a decision to live. Now I know a lot about HIV. I am confident that I can work, and I am able to live. I know that we are the same people as everybody else, we are not infectious.”

To those who only got to know about their diagnosis, Salavat advises to be strong and take care about their health. It is very important to enjoy life, to share joy, and not to lapse into a cocoon of self-isolation.

ACCEPTING THE DIAGNOSIS

Oksana learned that she was HIV positive in the rehabilitation centre for drug addiction.

The acceptance of her diagnosis benefited Oksana’s professional and personal development

“It was scary, somehow I made myself believe that I had only five years left to live and I have to fill my last years with fun and unforgettable experience!” Oksana is saying. “Before my diagnosis, I thought that HIV is something that is far away and it is impossible to get it in Kazakhstan.”

At that time, the woman needed support, and she got it from her family. The first one who learned about her diagnosis was Oksana’s sister.

“Later I asked her what she felt when she found out that I was HIV positive,” Oksana remembers. “Surprisingly enough, most of all she was worried about me, because the first thing I could convince her in was that I had only five years to live. About three years later, I accepted my diagnosis. I realized that I am not dying, and started to learn how to live with HIV.”

The acceptance of the diagnosis did not only benefit Oksana’s professional development, but also her personal development.

“I am happy to be busy with my favourite things, I am with a person I love and my family is very friendly. I learned how to live with HIV. You just need take more care about your health and love life!” Oksana resumes.

TO BELIEVE IN RECOVERY

After being diagnosed, Sultanamurat started to appreciate life more

The only thing Sultanmurat knew about tuberculosis was that it is a dangerous disease. When he heard his diagnosis, he became horrified.

“I experienced haemoptysis. It was scary, but I did not even suspect that it could be tuberculosis. I thought that I had some problems with my internal organs,” recalls Sultanmurat. “I really wanted to be cured, but the treatment was going very difficult. In the beginning, I did not tolerate the medicine and developed allergies. I was fighting with myself, tried not to miss a single day of taking medications and injections. Now I feel much better.”

After being diagnosed, Sultanamurat started to appreciate life more, treated people who are ill with better understanding, began to appreciate and love his relatives even more.

“I would like to tell those who are diagnosed with tuberculosis that this disease is curable, like many other diseases. The main thing is to follow the regime in everything, do not miss taking pills and eat well, move and do sports, be friendly,” Sultanmurat says. “The most important thing is to believe in the best, that is, in your recovery.”

AFEW Works Towards Ending Tuberculosis in the EECA region

World Tuberculosis Day is being recognized on the 24th of March in the whole world. This annual event commemorates the date in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch announced his discovery of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the bacillus that causes TB.

The theme of World TB Day 2017 is “Unite to End TB.” AFEW International‘s activities are also aimed on ending tuberculosis in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. In Kazakhstan, KNCV and AFEW-Kazakhstan are developing a model for structural collaboration between public health (TB, HIV, primary health care) and non-public sector through the DGIS-funded project in Almaty. AFEW International is coordinating this project. In March of 2016, a stakeholders meeting was organised to establish a Stop TB Partnership for Kazakhstan. This partnership reflects a close collaboration between different stakeholders, patients form an important group, working in the field of TB and HIV. 31 participants from NGOs, public TB and HIV services, and representatives of the Stop TB partnership of the Republic of Tajikistan took part in the meeting. The representatives from Tajikistan presented the value, successes and challenges of such partnership.

Kazakhstan is one of the three countries selected to develop a model to strengthen engagement with non-public sector for improved quality of TB/HIV services. Almaty was chosen for the implementation of the model because it is the largest urban area in the country. The project supports the establishment of a network of NGOs that have the capacity to provide TB and HIV care to the most vulnerable populations, and build a partnership between public and non-public sectors to improve access to TB and HIV care by the development of a referral mechanism.

Roman Dudnik: “People with HIV and Tuberculosis are the Same as We Are”

A photo exhibition dedicated to the World Tuberculosis Day will be opened in Almaty, Kazakhstan on March 18. The purpose of this exhibition is to show that people living with HIV or tuberculosis are the same as everyone else. This exhibition is one of the first important public events held by AFEW-Kazakhstan in 2017. We are talking about this and discussing other plans for this year with the executive director of AIDS Foundation East-West in Kazakhstan, Roman Dudnik.

– How was the year of 2016 for you? What were the new and exciting things that happened?

– Even though the year of 2016 was difficult, it was successful for us. We moved to a different office. Before, we were in the small office building. Now we are in the new building with much more space. The repairs were made based on our requirements, using our colours. There is a very good energy here, and it helps to work good.
In 2016 we finished the first part of the project HIV React that is financed by USAID/Central Asia, and we got the extension for the next three years. This is our main project. It is regional: we work in Kazakhstan, Kyrgyzstan and Tajikistan. Being the part of this project, we are working in preventing HIV among injecting drug users in prisons. We also work with people living with HIV who are getting ready to be released, and those who are already released. With specially developed START plus program, we prepare a person for his release two months before it happens, and then continue to work with a person for another four months after the release. Additionally, we train medical and non-medical staff of correctional facilities and employees of non-governmental organizations. This program is unique and does not work in many countries of the world. All efforts are aimed at preventing HIV infection and supporting those who live with HIV. The main goal, of course, is to encourage a person to get tested for HIV. If the test is positive, then we send a person to the AIDS centre, and we motivate him to start treatment with antiretroviral medicine, if necessary. We also help to restore needed documents, find jobs, renew social connections. This program is unique because it has a human face. We are aimed at a specific person, at solving of his or her problems. We also try to form skills so that people can solve their problems in the future themselves.

– Working in three countries in Central Asia with the same groups of population in HIV React project, can you observe the common tendencies?

– The general trends in all three countries are that HIV in places of detention exists, and the number of new cases of HIV transmission is increasing. Convicts is the group that requires intense attention and constant work. There is a very high level of stigma from prison staff. Of course, the reason for this is a lack of information, and this is what we are trying to correct through the trainings. The most successful project is implemented in Kyrgyzstan, where the criminal executive system is more open and sympathetic to such activities. In Kazakhstan and Tajikistan it is a little more difficult, but despite this, we manage to work and implement all planned activities within the framework of the project.

– Besides this, what were other projects that you worked on in 2016? 

– Since January we started with the new City Health project with the financial support of the Global Fund, where the main grant recipient is the International Charitable Foundation “Alliance for Public Health”. The project works in five cities of the EECA region. We are responsible for work in Almaty. Implementing this project, we will involve the city administration in the prevention of HIV infection among vulnerable groups: injecting drug users, men who have sex with men, and sex workers. We plan to create a city council on HIV/AIDS. We know that the project is not simple, but it is interesting for us. For Almaty, the project is very important, since it is the most populated city in the country, and the problem of HIV infection is especially relevant here. It will be important for us to make this a successful model and to duplicate this experience to other cities and countries.

– A year ago you had a school of tolerance, the goal of which was to reduce stigma on the part of health care providers. Please, tell us if you can see the results of this school?

– It is difficult and too early to talk about the results. Stigma and discrimination are big problems for Kazakhstan and whole Central Asia, and this is one of our main areas of work. One school of tolerance cannot solve this issue. Without any doubt, there is a big difference in how people come to the training, and what they think after three or five days of the training. In our training, we focus on the personal qualities of a person, perform the situations when the participant himself acts as a client or the representative of a vulnerable group, and is experiencing everything what the client is experiencing by himself. Human intolerance was formed long ago, and one year of work cannot change it. Nevertheless, there is already some progress in this field.

– On the 18th of March you will have the photo exhibition dedicated to the World Tuberculosis Day. Please, tell us more about it.

– The exhibition is intersecting with the topic of stigma and discrimination. We invite everybody to come and see it. It will be held from 18 to 31 of March in the gallery June 24. During the exhibition, there will be master classes, lectures, and talks with people who are depicted on the photos. On the photos, there are 15 Kazakhstani people who live with HIV, or who were cured of tuberculosis. The name of the exhibition Life in the Shadow speaks for itself, because due to the human ignorance, the heroes of our photos should hide their diagnosis from others and live with their problem alone in fear. Now they have opened their faces for the exhibition and they are not afraid to share their experiences. By each photo, there is a written piece with the story of the person: what he was going through, what he was thinking about. The purpose of the exhibition is to shed light on everyday life of people affected by HIV and tuberculosis. They are just like us. The only difference is that they know their diagnosis and they have to fight for their health. Myths and prejudices about HIV and tuberculosis make them hide this part of their lives. Although, the understanding and support of others is what helps them to defeat the disease. The exhibition is positive; people are smiling on the photos. We made only colour photos that show people in everyday life: in the flower shop, in the metro, during painting. During the exhibition, we will tell the visitors about HIV and tuberculosis, tolerance. We will also distribute flyers with the information about where you can bring, for example, bags with clothes that are no longer needed and help people who live with HIV in such a way.

– Even though it is almost the end of the first quarter of 2017, I still would like to ask you about the plans of AFEW-Kazakhstan for this year.

– We plan to work with our projects further. In April, we will be having big regional training about gender violence. We already invited a very good professional in this field to be our trainer. This is a new topic for us, and everything new is interesting for us.