AIDS Foundation East-West becomes AFEW International

ImprimirAIDS Foundation East-West, an international network of civil society organisations that is dedicated to improving the health of key populations, has changed its name to AFEW International.

A new logo and communication strategy have been created, and now they are part of the organisation’s identity. “With this new name we keep the recognisability and our brand as many partners in the field already know us,” says the executive director of AFEW International Anke van Dam. “With the new name we also acknowledge that we do more than HIV and AIDS. AFEW has built a track record for projects on TB, viral hepatitis and sexual and reproductive health and rights as well. AFEW strives to social inclusion of the key populations at risk and a healthy future of Eastern Europe and Central Asia!”

AFEW is dedicated to improving the health of key populations in society. With a focus on Eastern Europe and Central Asia, AFEW strives to promote health and increase access to prevention, treatment and care for major public health concerns such as HIV, TB, viral hepatitis, and sexual and reproductive health.

AFEW International is an uniquely positioned organisation as one of the few HIV, TB, hepatitis and sexual and reproductive health and rights organisations working in Eastern Europe and Central Asia. This is a region where the work is critical, as HIV and sexually transmitted infections are on the rise, sexuality education is deficient and gender-based violence goes largely unrecognized. Further, cases of multidrug resistant and extensive drug resistant tuberculosis are increasing; and there is a very high prevalence of hepatitis C. The group with the highest risk for HIV and HIV related diseases are people who use drugs. However, transmission through sexual contact is increasing and the prevalence among women and men who have sex with men is increasing.

Natalya Shumskaya: “We Want to Improve Country Health System Coordinating Mechanisms”

shumskayaPublic Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West in the Kyrgyz Republic” makes a significant contribution to public health of the country in reducing the growth rate of socially significant infections in Kyrgyzstan. The head of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan Natalya Shumskaya is telling what we should expect from the organisation in 2017, and outlines the achievements of the previous year.

 – How was the year of 2016 for AFEW-Kyrgyzstan? What do you think were your greatest successes?

– 2016 was a successful and fruitful for our organization. We managed to keep our activities on HIV prevention in the prison system, including law enforcement, prevention of HIV among women who use drugs. During the last year, 1013 women received an access to health and social services. One of the achievements was that in 2016 our organization supported the Ministry of Health of the Kyrgyz Republic in the development of the clinical protocol “Pregnancy, childbirth and the postnatal period for women who use drugs.” In December of the last year this protocol was adopted. Later, we started a very difficult project with the aim to return the patients with multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) to the treatment. Since August 2016, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan together with the City Centre for Tuberculosis Control in Bishkek started a project “Joint control of tuberculosis and HIV in Kyrgyz Republic.” During five months of 2016, 17 MDR-TB patients returned for the treatment; three patients co-infected with HIV were connected to antiretroviral treatment, five patients with tuberculosis and extensively drug resistant TB (XDR-TB) had the necessary tests, and their results were given to the council for inclusion in a treatment program under the new scheme. There was organized controlled treatment at home for 28 patients. The delivery of products is done 6 days a week, except Sundays. Additionally, project case managers conduct information sessions with patients with MDR-TB and their inner social circle, monitor the side effects of anti-TB drugs, and, if necessary, deliver drugs to relieve the side effects. They also maintain regular contact with doctors. In January of 2017 we increased project staff. It was done for the full coverage of all MDR-TB patients who need to receive treatment at home and assisting them to diagnosis and friendly services. Two case managers and a social worker were hired.

– How is the work of the research department of your organization that you created two years ago?

– The Department continues to work successfully. Over the past year, the researchers conducted a qualitative study among the inmates of correctional facilities that are getting ready to be released. It was called “Prisons, injecting drugs and the environment of risk of HIV infection.” This is a continuation of the positive experience of effective cooperation of AFEW-Kyrgyzstan with medical school researchers from Yale University and the State Penitentiary Service of the Kyrgyz Republic. This study aims to describe and research the quality of the program of methadone substitution treatment in the penitentiary system of Kyrgyzstan and civil society. The recommendations based on those results will be offered to the country to optimize harm reduction programs.

– One of the main directions of your work is cooperation with the police and the prison systems. Please tell us, how is this cooperation going? What is the role of AFEW in it?

– AFEW cooperates with the Ministry of Internal Affairs for 10 years already. In 2016 our organization has provided technical support to the Ministry in carrying out monitoring visits to all the regions of the country. The aim of the visits was to control how the law enforcement officers perform the instruction on HIV prevention. In addition, we organized and conducted four trainings for the staff responsible for the official trainings and for non-governmental organizations on the reform of law enforcement agencies. It is important that the civil sector supports current reforms, and it is important that law enforcement officers assist the execution of the State Programme on HIV.

AFEW is also working with the penitentiary system of the country for more than 10 years. We work together in three areas: technical assistance and coordination, increasing the capacity of staff and providing direct services to prisoners. In 2016 we worked first in six and then in four institutions to promote the goal 90-90-90. We provided services for people who inject drugs (PIDs), told them about HIV and the ways of transmission, motivated them to pass the test for HIV. We actively worked with people living with HIV at the stages of realising of the diagnosis, preparation for therapy, start of therapy, development of adherence to treatment. One of the achievements, of course, is to extend the work on the colony-settlements. Before, prisoners there fell of HIV prevention services, as there are no medical units there, and they usually have no documents for getting help from the civilian health organizations.

– In October AFEW-Kyrgyzstan helped to sign a memorandum of cooperation of four key groups. Please, tell us what these groups are and why their teamwork is so important? How is this cooperation going now?

– Unfortunately, there is mutual stigma within the key groups. Cooperation can help to overcome barriers and build partnerships. The leaders of key groups started to work closer. They discuss new joint projects, research abstracts for AIDS2018 conference in Amsterdam. Together they will carry out activities to reduce stigma and discrimination in relation to other key groups through the mini-session, for example, PIDs for LGBT and sex workers’ organizations. Since last year, we have been inviting all the participants of memorandum for the event and, of course, they also invite us for their events.

– In February, you will host a training for the members of the Country Coordinating Committee on HIV/AIDS (CCC) project BACK UP-Health. Tell us more about it. What are other areas of your work with the CCC?

– Starting from July 2016, AFEW-Kyrgyzstan will implement the project “Harmonization and consolidation of resources to fight HIV infection and tuberculosis in Kyrgyzstan.” It will be done with the financial support of GIZ, program Back Up-Health. With this project we want to improve the coordination mechanisms in the country’s health care system. We want to involve civil society in the discussion on the reform of CCC, and we also want to increase the capacity of the Committee. In February of 2017 AFEW-Kyrgyzstan plans to host a seminar for members of the CCC to prepare the Country Request for continued funding in the state funding for 2018-2020. The following groups will take part in the seminar: members of the Committee for the preparation of applications for resource mobilization and harmonization of CCC; CCC board; members of the Advisory Working Group, which were included by the Kyrgyz Ministry of Health; national experts who work on the preparation of the request for continued funding who will directly collect information and write application; international consultant; head of the expert working group on writing requests for funding, and also key partners from the public and international sectors which may influence decisions and who expressed their readiness to provide technical assistance in the preparation of high-quality country request to the state financing from Kyrgyzstan. During the workshop, participants will act as experts and will share their knowledge and experience with each another. They will also learn how to fill the forms for the requests, will learn the new priority areas of TB and HIV, which are included in national policies and programs, will discuss and analyse the share of public funding, make mapping of the services, clients and funding. Actually, the main purpose of this seminar is to assist the CCC, experts and other stakeholders in the preparation of high-quality application. We want everyone to have one vision and one structure of the request, so that the process of approval of the CCC members is efficient and fast.

– What are AFEW-Kyrgyzstan plans for the year of 2017?

– AFEW-Kyrgyzstan spent its first three years as a local non-governmental organization. The most important achievement is that we were able to successfully implement its first strategic plan and to develop partnerships with international and donor organizations. In 2017 we will review the strategic plan of the organization. Of course, the priority for the board of the organization has been and continues to be ensuring of the stability of the organization.

Reasons for Drug Policy Reform

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Text: Michel Kazatchkine, UN secretary general special envoy on HIV/AIDS in Eastern Europe and Central Asia

Why is eastern Europe the only region in the world that still has a growing HIV epidemic? In one of the region’s countries, Russia, more than two thirds of all HIV infections, and 55% of the near 100 000 new infections reported last year, resulted from drug injection.

Some 3.2 million people in eastern Europe inject drugs, and about 1.5 million of them are in Russia. In 2007 the number of newly reported HIV cases among Russian people who inject drugs (12 538) was similar to the number in the rest of eastern Europe (12 026). But since then the numbers have diverged hugely.

Scaling up of harm reduction programmes in several countries coincided with a stabilising of HIV rates—and fewer than 7000 new cases outside Russia in 2014. In Russia, however, where access to sterile needles and syringes is low and opioid substitutes remain illegal and unavailable, the number of people who inject drugs newly infected with HIV climbed to nearly 22 500 in 2014.

Criminalisation of drug use

The reasons for Russia’s high figures include the prohibition and effective criminalisation of drug use, repressive law enforcement, and stigma around drug use. These factors lead people to inject in unsafe conditions for fear of police and arrests and result in needle sharing and overdose.

In 2015, the United Nations’ secretary general, Ban Ki-Moon, called for “careful rebalancing of the international policy on controlled drugs.”

“We must consider alternatives to criminalisation and incarceration of people who use drugs,” he said. “We should increase the focus on public health, prevention, treatment, and care.”

The World Health Organization, the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime, and UNAIDS jointly recommend a package of harm reduction interventions as best practice to reduce the risk of acquiring, and improve treatment of, HIV, hepatitis, and tuberculosis among people who inject drugs. Such strategies, which do not require prohibition of harmful behaviours, are key to reducing death and disease because drug dependency is characterised by people’s inability to abstain.

Continue reading here.

Ikram Ibragimov: “AFEW-Tajikistan is the Only NGO with HIV Rapid Testing Services in the Country”

Фото ИкромThe activities of AIDS Foundation East-West Tajikistan for already 15 years are directed into improving the health of key populations at higher risk of HIV infection. Last December HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point was opened in in the representative office of RPO AFEW-Tajikistan in the city of Qurghonteppa. Director of AFEW-Tajikistan Ikram Ibragimov tells about the achievements of the testing point and the organisation in general.

– How was the year of 2016 for AFEW-Tajikistan? What new and important things happened?

– The year was full with events. We changed the statute of the organisation, and we made the areas and directions of its activities wider. We also developed and approved the strategy of the development of the organisation for the medium term, strengthened the partnership and cooperation with governmental and non-governmental organizations in the health sector. We have our own new premises for our office. We renovated it, and have been working there for three months already. In November of the last year we elected the management of the organisation – the board, the audit committee and the director – for the years of 2017-2021. Generally speaking, I would say that 2016 was successful for us.

– Just recently you opened HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point in Qurghonteppa. Why did you choose this city to be the “base” for it?

– Our second office is situated in Qurghonteppa. That is why we decided to open HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point on the premises where key groups of population are already provided with the direct services. By the way, now we are the only NGO in the country that has such service. Besides, one of the main routes of Afghan drug traffic goes through Khatlon region and that is why drug addiction level in the region is high. People who use drugs are the main target audience for us. As a rule, donors and partners work in the capital and on the North of the country. We decided to go South.

HTC center 3– What are the first results of HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point?

– Starting from December, 1 and up until December, 31 there were 18 people tested for HIV: 9 men and 9 women. Thanks God, there were no new cases of HIV found. People find out about our testing point from our website, media, business-cards that we disseminate, information from the clients who visit the centre themselves. Mostly, our visitors are representatives of key populations.

– At the end of 2016 you developed a draft of multilateral agreement on cooperation in the field of prevention of socially significant diseases in Khatlon region and the provision of medical, social and legal services for vulnerable groups. What does it mean?

– This agreement means the cooperation with different organisations that provide complex services (medical-psychological, social, legal and others) to key populations on many levels. The agreement is created on the existing epidemical situation with taking into consideration the socially significant diseases in Khatlon region in Tajikistan. It is planned that 46 government and non-government organisations of the region will become the members of the agreement. We strive to create favourable conditions for the clients of our social support services, so that they can get high-quality, timely and free services of certain specialists. The service should be affordable. Therefore, this memorandum is intended to lower the difficulty of access to services for key populations, and to create a basis for the integration of various services “under one roof.” This is so-called principle of “the single window.”

– What are AFEW-Tajikistan’s plans for 2017?

– As I mentioned before, last year we agreed upon the strategy of the organisational development for 2017-2019. Therefore, all our plans are directed into reaching the quality indicators of this strategy.

Bridging the Gaps in Women’s Hostel in Kyrgyzstan

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Leila and Sofia live in women hostel in Bishkek

Five-year-old Sofia is playing with her mother’s telephone. The girl is sitting on the floor and is listening to the music. She is switching between the songs, watching videos, and trying to find her favourite track. There are four beds in a small room. At some moment, the girl puts the phone away and asks: “Mom, what will Santa bring me?”

“What would you like, dear?” she hears from her mother, and the broad smile appears on her face. “I would like him to bring me a kitten. I will feed it with milk.”

When the girl is smiling, she has cute dimples on her cheeks. She brings a toy – plastic alphabet with the buttons. She presses the letters and repeats them. Sometimes she gets the letters wrong, and then the mother asks her to do it again.

TELLS ABOUT HIV TO NEW FRIENDS

Sofia and her forty-year-old mother Leila live in the hostel that operates in the centre of adaptation and socialization of women – injecting drug users in the public fund Asteria in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan. Leila was recently released from prison.

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Leila is teaching Sofia an alphabet

“I do not have any relatives; I was raised in the orphanage. I got to prison when I was pregnant, and my daughter was born there,” Leila tells. “Now I work in the kitchen or wash the floors. Recently I went to Turkey, and wanted to find a job there, but I do not know Turkish language, and that is why it did not happen. By education, I am a seamstress and a pastry chef, but it is hard to find a job because I am HIV-positive. I am being asked about my diagnosis all the time, and I always have to go through medical examinations. Now I have found a job as a nursemaid, but I do not have anyone to leave my daughter with. She has to go to kindergarten, but all of them here are not free of charge. I will have to spend almost whole salary to cover the pay for kindergarten… I am currently waiting for the cash advance to pay.”

Leila says that she tells her new friends about her diagnosis, even though she does not always want to do it.

“I think, people with my disease should talk about it, and warn others as well. Now I also bring other people to get tested. I am telling them they have to do it, and that it is free of charge,” Leila says. “Of course, people treat me different when I tell them about my diagnosis. Yes, it is unpleasant, but I am happy that in this way I do something nice to others. Everybody should know such things.”

PRAYING FOR ASTERIA

Leila is worried that the hostel in Asteria can be closed. In that case, the woman can end up on the street. She does not have anywhere to go to.

“I should not be complaining; we have everything here. The main thing is the roof over your head,” the woman smiles and hugs her daughter. “I am very comfortable here. We receive medical treatment, there is a place to sleep, to do laundry. Every Sunday we go to church. In the church I always pray for this house, for people who help us here, and ask God that the organization has donors.”

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The head of Asteria Iren Ermolaeva shows the rules of the hostel

Leila says that she would like to move from the hostel in the future, but she does not have such possibility yet. She dreams of her own home, family, and work. She also wishes that the hostel will never close. People who work in Asteria have the same desire.

“We indeed often have problems with financing. Every year we do not know what to expect in the next one,” the head of the public fund Asteria Iren Ermolaeva says. “Our public fund is working since 2007, and the hostel – since 2009. We would like to have the whole range of services, but there is not enough financing these days. We know how to find the approach to women, we know how to create friendly atmosphere so that a woman would want to change her life for better herself, and we would like to use this knowledge. We feel sorry for our clients, and we would like to help them more.”

DREAMING ABOUT OWN HOUSE

Workers of Asteria also dream about purchasing the house where they will place the centre of adaptation and socialization of women – injecting drug users and the hostel. They have already found funds for the future house renovation, but cannot find money for its purchase.

“Then we would be able to have social entrepreneurship, maybe some little farm. In that way, we could at least not depend on donors in food,” the coordinator of the social services of the fund Tatiana Musagalieva is saying. “Until now, we rented all three houses for our centre.”

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Asteria workers Iren Ermolaeva (on the right) and Tatiana Musagalieva say that their organisation often has problems with financing

Thanks to “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations” project from Public Foundation “AIDS Foundation East-West in the Kyrgyz Republic”, in 2016 Asteria could support four beds in the hostel. The project also helped with medicine and warm food.

“People often come to us to eat, to do laundry,” Iren Ermolaeva says. “Around 300 women come through our centre during one year. Leila, for instance, came here after she was released from prison. She has got all the necessary services, clothes, shoes, and got medical examinations. Leila was imprisoned for five years, and, now, due to the conditions that we have, she adapts and integrates into society. In this way, she becomes more confident in herself, can find a job and build her future.”

Compass Centre in Kharkiv, Ukraine: when Policeman Becomes an Uncle

img_0039“I come here often,” Senior Inspector of the Juvenile Prevention Department of National Police of Kharkiv region, Ukraine, Andrii Stadnik is sitting by the table in the centre Compass of Kharkiv City Charitable Foundation Blago. He is smiling and pointing at the table. “Look, here I even have my own cup to drink from…”

Andrii Stadnik started to work in police in 1998. He says he is very happy with his job now. In Compass he meets many children who are grateful for not being send to prison, and he likes to be able to help them. The regulars of the centre even call him uncle Andrii, and this shows very good relations between people in the Ukrainian culture.

18 years old Oleksandr (Sasha) is sitting in front of Andrii, at the same table. Sasha is one of the main characters in the film that was made about the centre Compass a few years ago. Once he was detained by Andrii Stadnik and stayed under police control for some time. Now, after the client management program at Compass, Olexandr is doing much better. He even found a job as a security guard. “Now I somehow feel as Andrii’s colleague,” Sasha smiles.

“The criminal juvenile cases decreased tremendously last years, due to the approach when juvenile police is collaborating with a youth centre that offers client management. These alternative supporting ways are more constructive and more effective,” Senior Inspector of the Juvenile Prevention Department is telling us. “Previously there were 2000 cases per year, and now it is 362. The formulas of substances that circulate on the streets change so fast that young people can often not be prosecuted, but by giving youth an option and an alternative for other options, young people have less problems and also cause less problems for the society they live in.”

img_0036There are 492.000 children in the region in total. 897 families are under juvenile department control in Kharkiv region in Ukraine. The Juvenile Police checks these families, sees how they are doing, and if there are cases of child abuse, financial problems, and so on. Kharkiv Juvenile police is also inviting colleagues from other smaller cities or villages, and teaches them how to work with the Centre Compass. Through this cooperation they found out that young people from the region have difficulties with coming to the Centre since Kharkiv is too far for them. That is why now once a week a social worker of the Centre travels to the villages to counsel young people in need there.

Kharkiv City Charitable Foundation Blago has a long history of working with key populations, including people who use drugs, sex workers, men having sex with men and street children. The organisation started to work with adolescents using drugs since 2012 within the framework of “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights of Key Populations” project, through ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine.) Bridging the Gaps project supported the opening of the centre Compass that specifically serves vulnerable adolescents and young people, focusing on youth using drugs. The centre offers psychological counseling services, medical help, testing for HIV, hepatitis B and C. It is a daycare facility with social workers, psychologists and medical workers. The centre is providing case management services to youth using drugs, and also works with youth in prisons, and vocational schools.

“AFEW-Tajikistan” is Opening HIV Rapid Testing Point

qurghonteppa_2010_02HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point will be opened on December 1, 2016 in Qurghonteppa, Tajikistan. Testing point will be situated in the representative office of RPO “AFEW-Tajikistan” in Khatlon region.

Official opening ceremony of the HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point is supported by the Administration on public health and social protection of population of the Hukumat of Khatlon region and the Regional AIDS Center. During the opening, 25 representatives of governmental, international and public organizations will learn about experience of the RPO “AFEW-Tajikistan” in introduction of HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing service.

The activity is conducted within the “Bridging the Gaps: Health and rights of key populations -2.0” – program funded by the Ministry of Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands.

HIV voluntary counselling and rapid testing point is located at 9 Lokhuti Street, Qurghoonteppa, Representative office of RPO “AFEW-Tajikistan” in Khatlon region.

 

Community Members Learnt how to Do Research Themselves

img_111324 participants from 11 countries took part in the community-based participatory research training in Bishkek, Kyrgyzstan on 8-10 November. Three-day training equipped participants with the skills on how to conduct community based participatory research.

Participants learnt how to form community-based participatory research (CBPR) partnerships and how to access community strengths and dynamics. The trainers explained how to identify priority public health issues and research questions, how to design and conduct causal, intervention or policy research.

“Being the member of the community myself, I wanted to know about how to conduct the research in the context of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and people who use drugs. Researching is very exciting, especially if you can relate to the topic. Before I did not have any similar training, but now I already have some ideas for the future work,” –director of “Community of people living with HIV in Uzbekistan” Sergey Uchayev says.

Participants became “critical friends”

img_0863The e-learning course, developed by Health[e]Foundation, AFEW and FLOWZ, within the training was meant to equip community based organizations and community members with tools and resources to conduct CBPR.

“What inspired me about people in this workshop was that although they came here two days ago from 11 different countries, they were immediately working together as one group. They became so-called “critical friends” who help and support each other in shaping first ideas into very specific, good quality research plans,” says the project manager of Health[e]Foundation.

img_0637Training participants, lots of whom were members of the communities, got the skills in doing the research and came up with new ideas. They got to know about data collection methods and drafted their research designs. Participants also noticed the practical side of the training. “During the training I came up with many ideas and was able to structure my earlier knowledge for myself. I also started to understand who these researches are for, why they should be conducted and how the results could benefit the communities,” – director of public association “Ameliya” from Kazakhstan Natalya Zholnerova is saying. – “The atmosphere during the training helped studying and sharing my own knowledge. Now I understand more how to choose the region and target group, and what donors are paying attention to.”

Grants will be soon announced

img_1164AFEW International director Anke van Dam announced about the possibility to apply for grants that will support their research. Grants for community based organizations and community members will be announced soon.

“It is very valuable that there is a possibility to write a grant proposal and implement some project in the future,” – the volunteer of Belorussian MRF “Feniks” Kateryna Parfeniuk is saying. – “Every day of this training was useful for me, and now I have valuable instruments for my future work. Informal communication with the training participants provided me with some additional ideas.”

The training in Bishkek was the first step in the capacity building program for community based organizations in order to enable them to develop and conduct CBPR, analyze collected data and present them at the AIDS Conference 2018 in Amsterdam. The following trainings and webinars as well as the online e-course will support developing abstracts for the AIDS2018.

Further information will be available on AFEW website.

Key Populations of Kyrgyzstan Signed Memorandum of Cooperation

img_4835Organizations that work with various key populations in Kyrgyzstan had their first partners’ meeting to develop joint action plan in October 2016. The meeting was attended not only by the staff of organizations working within the framework of the project “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations 2”, but also by the representatives of key populations. The main goal was to create a joint action plan for the year of 2017.

Four organizations that work with key populations SW, PUD and LGBT in Kyrgyzstan are getting grants within the project “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights for Key Populations 2.” It is not a secret that stigma exists within key populations, and the partners’ meeting and common work in the future could help to overcome barriers and build partnerships.

– Before this meeting, the cooperation of key groups existed, but it was scattered, – the representative of the LGBT community Sanjar says. – Only some of the organizations or individuals were working together. I think that now there will be more understanding, cohesion and partnership development. With this meeting we started the construction of the charter community solidarity. We did not know about the problems of each other, but the joint activity will help to get to know them more.

At the meeting, partners developed activities based on common challenges and discussed methods of communication when working together. Organizations that work with different key populations plan to set up a Google group for the permanent exchange of information and will carry out such partnership meetings on an annual basis.

– For me, joint work showed that despite many differences and peculiarities of each particular group, we have many common barriers, which are based, in my opinion, on stigma and discrimination of key populations, – says PUD representative Sergey. – Partners’ meeting was a great opportunity to better understand the challenges that such key populations as LGBT and SW are facing. I was surprised by their professionalism and ability to work together.

Following the meeting, four organizations signed a Memorandum of Cooperation. In the document they agreed to work together to ensure the access of key populations to social, legal, psychological, medical and other services without discrimination, taking into account gender-specifications.

Access and Quality of Youth-Friendly Health Services in Ukraine Presented During Youth Week in Amsterdam

dsc00091AFEW-Ukraine’s Project Manager, Iryna Nerubaieva, will take part in the Share-Net Youth Week which is held in the Netherlands from 26th-30th September. Iryna will speak about increasing access and quality of youth-friendly health services for young key populations: people who use drugs in Ukraine.

The Youth Week, organized by Share-Net and its members, will link comprehensive sexuality education and youth friendly health services to broader discussions on gender, gender based violence and sustainable development. The Youth Week will take place in two Dutch cities: The Hague and Amsterdam. The whole program of the Youth Week is available here.

Iryna Nerubaieva from AFEW-Ukraine will be giving her speech on Tuesday, September 27, in De Balie, Amsterdam, during the workshop “Service Delivery and Quality Assurance”, starting at 2pm.

Iryna Nerubaieva coordinates innovative and pilot projects, such as the Immediate Intervention Programme for HIV-positive women and is also responsible for M&E and human rights components of the Bridging the Gaps programme in AFEW-Ukraine. Iryna has 10 years of experience in the sphere of HIV/AIDS prevention, which started from volunteering. Prior to her work in AFEW, Iryna worked for the Alliance for Public Health in Ukraine within Harm Reduction projects among populations most vulnerable to HIV (IDUs, MSM, SW, prisoners) and for Deutsche Gesellschaft für Internationale Zusammenarbeit (GIZ) as a Consultant within the primary prevention project for children and youth “The Join in Circuit on AIDS, Love & Sexuality.”

Please, join us on Tuesday, September 27 at 2pm for the workshop!