European Community Health Worker Online Survey

The first ever Europe-wide online survey has been launched with the aim of improving health care services for men who have sex with men (MSM). The ECHOES survey is the first of its kind to target community health workers who provide sexual health support including counselling, testing, and psychosocial care for MSM. The findings of the ground-breaking ECHOES survey will be used to help understand who CHWs in Europe are, what they do, where they do it, how, and why they do it. Findings will also be used to identify the barriers and challenges to CHWs as well as identify training needs.

‘Community Health Worker’ (CHW) is a relatively new term for Europe. Many CHWs go by different titles such as outreach workers, peer educators, NGO workers, promoters, peer counsellors, peer navigators, lay health workers, health providers, community advocates, volunteers, and so on. Regardless of title, CHWs represent a large and diverse group of people who provide crucial sexual health support around HIV/AIDS, viral hepatitis and other Sexually Transmitted Infections (STIs), to gay, bisexual and other MSM in community settings.

The survey was developed by the University of Brighton’s ECHOES development team (Dr Nigel Sherriff, Professor Jörg Huber, and Dr Nick McGlynn) and focuses on different aspects of daily activities of CHWs, their beliefs, level of knowledge, and experiences. Dr Sherriff said:

“The overall aim is to assess the knowledge, attitudes and practices of community based health workers providing health services for MSM. It will provide the baseline for the evaluation and further improvement of training programmes and materials for training of community health workers working with MSM and for quality improvement of the services provided for MSM.

“We hope as many workers as possible throughout Europe who provide sexual health services for MSM in the community will take part. This will be crucial to help ensure the findings are able to inform future policy priorities for the European Commission and its member states.”

European Community Health Workers Online Survey (ECHOES) is available online NOW in 16 languages and will remain open until 31st December 2017.  Take part here.

Further information:

ECHOES is part of ESTICOM project funded by the European Health Programme 2014 – 2020. ESTICOM also includes EMIS 2017 the survey addressing gay men and other MSM and a training programme for CHWs in order to improve access and quality of prevention, diagnosis of HIV/AIDS, STI and viral hepatitis and health care services for gay men and other MSM. The project is coordinated by the Robert Koch Institute in Berlin.

The Project is an important opportunity to strengthen community response and raise awareness about the persisting legal, structural, political and social barriers hindering a more effective response to the syndemic of HIV, viral hepatitis B and C, and other STIs among MSM. Early findings are expected in the Spring of 2018.

To take part in the ECHOES survey go to: www.echoessurvey.eu

To find out more about the project go to: www.esticom.eu 

AFEW’s Intern Researches PrEP in Kazakhstan

Is Kazakhstan prepared for pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP)? Master student majoring in International Public Health at VU University in Amsterdam Marieke Bak was finding the answer to this question during her recent internship with AFEW International. For this reason, she spent five months in Almaty, Kazakhstan, doing her research.

“For the past five months, I have had the opportunity to do an internship at AFEW International,” says Marieke. “From the start, I felt very welcome in this inspiring organisation and it was great to experience what it is like to work for an NGO. As part of my internship, I went to Kazakhstan to explore the potential implementation of a new HIV prevention method among men who have sex with men. The interviews were incredibly interesting and I learned a lot from the people I met. Moreover, I had the opportunity to do some travelling, which made me fall in love with the region. I hope to go back there someday and I will keep following the work of AFEW with much interest.”

The global HIV/AIDS epidemic remains a major public health issue. Among the countries with the fastest accelerating incidence rates is Kazakhstan, which is characterised by a concentrated epidemic among key populations. Addressing the epidemic requires effective primary prevention, but current methods are often of limited use. PrEP is a new method of HIV prevention consisting of a daily pill combining two anti-retroviral drugs, which has been found very effective when taken consistently. Generally, men who have sex with men (MSM) are seen as the target group for PrEP. As the most developed country in Central Asia, it seems that Kazakhstan could act as a frontrunner in providing PrEP. However, in order to inform the implementation of PrEP, there is a need to understand the awareness and attitudes of MSM towards this new method.

The aim of Marieke Bak’s study was to explore the possibilities for future PrEP initiatives in Kazakhstan by investigating the potential of this prevention method among men who have sex with men. You can find the report on the study findings here.

Compass Centre in Kharkiv, Ukraine: when Policeman Becomes an Uncle

img_0039“I come here often,” Senior Inspector of the Juvenile Prevention Department of National Police of Kharkiv region, Ukraine, Andrii Stadnik is sitting by the table in the centre Compass of Kharkiv City Charitable Foundation Blago. He is smiling and pointing at the table. “Look, here I even have my own cup to drink from…”

Andrii Stadnik started to work in police in 1998. He says he is very happy with his job now. In Compass he meets many children who are grateful for not being send to prison, and he likes to be able to help them. The regulars of the centre even call him uncle Andrii, and this shows very good relations between people in the Ukrainian culture.

18 years old Oleksandr (Sasha) is sitting in front of Andrii, at the same table. Sasha is one of the main characters in the film that was made about the centre Compass a few years ago. Once he was detained by Andrii Stadnik and stayed under police control for some time. Now, after the client management program at Compass, Olexandr is doing much better. He even found a job as a security guard. “Now I somehow feel as Andrii’s colleague,” Sasha smiles.

“The criminal juvenile cases decreased tremendously last years, due to the approach when juvenile police is collaborating with a youth centre that offers client management. These alternative supporting ways are more constructive and more effective,” Senior Inspector of the Juvenile Prevention Department is telling us. “Previously there were 2000 cases per year, and now it is 362. The formulas of substances that circulate on the streets change so fast that young people can often not be prosecuted, but by giving youth an option and an alternative for other options, young people have less problems and also cause less problems for the society they live in.”

img_0036There are 492.000 children in the region in total. 897 families are under juvenile department control in Kharkiv region in Ukraine. The Juvenile Police checks these families, sees how they are doing, and if there are cases of child abuse, financial problems, and so on. Kharkiv Juvenile police is also inviting colleagues from other smaller cities or villages, and teaches them how to work with the Centre Compass. Through this cooperation they found out that young people from the region have difficulties with coming to the Centre since Kharkiv is too far for them. That is why now once a week a social worker of the Centre travels to the villages to counsel young people in need there.

Kharkiv City Charitable Foundation Blago has a long history of working with key populations, including people who use drugs, sex workers, men having sex with men and street children. The organisation started to work with adolescents using drugs since 2012 within the framework of “Bridging the Gaps: Health and Rights of Key Populations” project, through ICF “AIDS Foundation East-West” (AFEW-Ukraine.) Bridging the Gaps project supported the opening of the centre Compass that specifically serves vulnerable adolescents and young people, focusing on youth using drugs. The centre offers psychological counseling services, medical help, testing for HIV, hepatitis B and C. It is a daycare facility with social workers, psychologists and medical workers. The centre is providing case management services to youth using drugs, and also works with youth in prisons, and vocational schools.